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Full text of "Annual report of the town officers of the town of Westboro for the year ending"

Two Hundred and Twenty -Third 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 

y£j/ —5— x&s 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



December 31, 1940 



Chronotype Printing Company 

Westborough, Mass. 

1941 



Two Hundred and Twenty -Third 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



December 31, 1940 



Chronotype Printing Company 

Westborough, Mass. 

1941 



Town Officers for 1 940 



Town Clerk 
ANNIE A. DUNNE 

Moderator 
ELLWOOD N. HENNESSY 



Selectmen 

WENDELL F. HAYWARD Term expires 1941 

ELMER W. BENNETT Term expires 1942 

CHRISTOPHER J. TYRRELL Term expires 1943 



Assessors 

CLEON C. SWEET Term expires 1941 

WILLIAM M. CROSBY Term expires 1942 

LAWRENCE F. FALES Term expires 1943 



4 

Treasurer 
GUSTAF H. CARLSON 

Tax Collector 
NOAH F. TRANK 

Town Accountant 
WILLIAM P. McGAHEY Term expires 1941 

Board of Public Welfare 

ALBION F. HITCHCOCK Term expires 1941 

WILLIAM M. BUXTON Term expires 1942 

JOHN R. HALEY Term expires 1943 

School Committee 

HARRY E. BURROUGHS Term expires 1941 

CHARLES A. KIMBALL Term expires 1942 

SARA A. MASON Term expires 1943 

Board of Health 

WILLIAM M. ELLIOTT Term expires 1941 

RUSSELL E. WILLIAMS Term expires 1943 

PHILIP J. BUTTERFIELD Term expires 1942 



5 

Trustees of Public Library 

ESTHER CAPRON Term expires 1941 

LUCY G. NASON Term expires 1941 

CHARLES H. REED Term expires 1941 

FLORENCE F. AYER Term expires 1942 

HAROLD G. CHAMBERLAIN Term expires 1942 

FRANK W. FORBES Term expires 1942 

KATHARINE MAYNARD Term expires 1943 

FRANCIS X. REILLY Term expires 1943 

RUFUS M. SHAW Term expires 1943 



Chief of Police 
THOMAS W. HUMPHREY 



Constables 

GEORGE W. APTT WALTER A. McTAGGART 

EDWARD BRALEY CHARLES A. PERRON 

GEORGE F. HIGGINS WINTHROP H. SPINNEY 

ROBERT J. HIGGINS MEREDITH W. VINTON 

THOMAS W. HUMPHREY 



Trustees of Cemeteries 



WILLIAM H. SANFORD Term expires 1941 

NATHAN E. ANDREWS Term expires 1942 

E. IRVING HULBERT Term expires 1943 

PAUL F. BRIGHAM Term expires 1944 

JAMES S. HUNTER Term expires 1945 



6 

Water Commissioners 

CHARLES A. KIMBALL Term expires 1941 

MAURICE C. LAMB Term expires 1942 

ELMER W. BENNETT Term expires 1943 



Sewer Commissioners 

CHARLES A. KIMBALL Term expires 1941 

MAURICE C. LAMB Term expires 1942 

ELMER W. BENNETT Term expires 1943 



Planning Board 



WILLIAM C. BLOIS Term expires 1941 

RUFUS M. SHAW Term expires 1941 

WILLIAM C. LIBBEY Term expires 1942 

FRANK W. FORBES Term expires 1943 

VICTOR G. OTTO Term expires 1943 



Tree Warden 
GEORGE E. HAYDEN 



Superintendent of Streets 
ROBERT B. JOHNSON 



7 

Registrars of Voters 

ROBERT L. DeARMOND Term expires 1941 

HUGH McCAFFREY Term expires 1942 

ADA F. FENNO Term expires 1943 

ANNIE A. DUNNE, Clerk of Board, ex-omcio 



Finance Committee 



LOUIS A. FAIRBANKS Term expires 1941 

B. HOWARD FAY Term expires 1941 

ALBERT E. LEWIS Term expires 1941 

NOAH NASON Term expires 1942 

DR. ROLAND S. NEWTON Term expires 1942 

D. AMBROSE WHELAN Term expires 1942 

HOWARD P. GILMORE Term expires 1943 

LEONARD M. KRULL Term expires 1943 

RALPH S. TYLER Term expires 1943 

Town Forest Committee 

WILLIAM C. BLOIS Term expires 1941 

JAMES S. HUNTER Term expires 1942 

NOAH NASON Term expires 1943 



Appointments 



Herbert D. Adams Fence Viewer 

Charles Mitton Fence Viewer 

Noah Nason Measurer of Wood 

Herbert D. Adams Measurer of Wood 

Charles Houlden Measurer of Leather 

I 
Lester L. Richards 

John W. Casey " " 

Robert E. Werner " " 

Robert B. Johnson Superintendent of Streets 

Charles H. Reed Inspector of Animals 

Charles H. Reed Inspector of Slaughtering 

Charles H. Reed Milk Inspector 

Noah Nason Public Weigher 

J. Shannon Nason 

Clifford Thorpe 

Guy Hutt 

Raymond L. Whitney 

Edward O 'Kennedy 

William jH. Gibbons 

George Bain 

Ralph E. Taylor 

Ralph N. Fales 

Joseph L. Zeni 

Ray E. Mason 

William C. Blois Chief, Fire Department 

George F. Higgins Fire Engineer 

Daniel P. Moynihan Fire Engineer 

Ada F. Fenno Registrar of Voters- 1943 

Ralph W. Frantz Sealer of Weights and Measures 



George W, Aptt Dog Officer 

Robert C. Harrington Fish and Game Warden 

William C. Blois Forest Warden 

Edward Goggin Burial Agent 

Christopher J. Tyrrell... Correspondent - State and Military Aid 

Howard P. Gilmore Moth Superintendent 

Thomas W. Humphrey 'Chief of Police 

George W. Aptt Night Watchman 

Henry J. Hayden .Constable 

Cornelius Teasdale Janitor of Town Hall 

Edna H. Bullen Referral Agent, W. P. A. 



Aptt, George W Pol 

Bean, C. Elton 

Belaska, John 

Blenkhorn, Harold 

Braley , Edward 

Braley, Gibbs 

Campbell, Donald 

Connors, William F 

Cooper, Oliver 

Cuppaidge, Henry A 

Dantsizen, John C 

DeArmond, Robert G 

DeBoer, Samuel 

Devin, William 

Dodd, Francis W 

Enman, Ernest L 

Fallon, Frank 

Farns worth, Louis 

Farrar, Robert 

Ford, William 

Frantz, Ralph 

Fryer, Thomas 

Goodwin, Herbert F : 

Graves, E Ellsworth 

Haley, John R 

Haley, William J 

Hanavan, John 

Hanlon, Matthew J 

Harrington, Robert C 

Hayden, Francis X 

Hayden, Henry J 



ice Officer 



10 



Hayward, Wendell F 

Heald, Raymond P 

Hennessy, Norman 

Henry, Thomas J 

Higgins, George F 

Higgins, James 'H 

Higgins, Robert J 

Hoffman, Louie F 

Hooper, William 

Humphrey, Walter 

Jackson, jMaurice W 

James, George P 

Johnson, Robert 

Johnson, William E 

Jones, Edward H 

Jordan, Walter F 

Kemp, Erford C 

Ladish, George O 

Lang, Walter E 

Lebeau, Francis 

Lebeau, George 

Lynch, Thomas 

Marsh, Irving L 

Marshall, William 

McCaffrey, Hugh 

McDaniels, Alexander 

McPherson, David 

McTaggart, Walter A 

Meighan, Henry 

Miller, William, Jr 

,Mollard, Robert S 

Morrison, Harold E 

Murphy, William H 

Naples, Charles 

Nourse, Irving 

Osman, Paul J 

Packard, George W., Jr. 

Perron, Charles L 

Pratt, Earle E 

Pulaski, Stephen 

Shipman, Roy S 

Spinney, Winthrop H 

Statzell, Guilford I 



11 



Stockbridge, Clarence. 

Stockwell, Frank 

Stone, J. W. Dewey 

Teasdale, Cornelius 

Trank, Noah F 

"Tyrrell, Christopher J. 

Varner, Eldon 

Vinton, Meredith W 

Walsh, Patrick J 

Ward, George 

Ward, James 

Wheble, William J 

White, Irving 

Whitney, Raymond L. 

Wiley, P. I 

Winslow, Henry 



Westborough, Mass., February 13, 1940. 
At a meeting of the Board of Selectmen, at which Deputy 
Sheriff Banfill and the Town Clerk were present, the name of 
Winthrop A. Fenno was drawn for Jury Duty. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



12 



Town Meeting March 4, 1 940 



TOWN WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Worcester, ss. 

To any Constable of the Town of Westborough, in the County 
of Worcester, Greeting: 

In the name of the 'Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are directed to notify and warn the Inhabitants of the Town 
of Westborough, qualified to vote in elections and town affairs, 
to meet in the Town Hall, in Westborough, on Monday, the 
fourth day of March, A. D. 19 40, at eight o'clock in the fore- 
noon, then and there to bring in their votes for 

Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, Tax Collector, nine Con- 
stables, and Tree Warden, all for one year; one Selectman, 
one Assessor, one .Member of Board of Public Welfare, one 
Member of School Committee, one Member Board of Health; 
three Trustees of Public Library, one Water Commissioner, 
one Sewer Commissioner, and two Members of Planning Board, 
all for three years; and one Trustee of Cemeteries for five 
years, 

And to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all other necessary Town Officers. 

Article 2. To see if tha Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning January 1, 1940, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, in accord- 



13 

ance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Article 3. To hear the reports of the several Town Officers 
and Committees and act thereon. 

Article 4. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as 
may be necessary to defray the expenses of the several Town 
departments for the ensuing year. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the employment of a nurse or 
nurses to be spent under the direction of the Board of Select- 
men as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 5, 
Clause 21, and amendments thereto. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to co-operate with 
the State under Chapter 81 in regard to the maintenance and 
repair of the highways of the Town or act anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to co-operate with the State and County 
in maintaining, repairing and improving its Chapter 90 high- 
ways. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to celebrate the Fourth of July by an 
exhibition of fireworks, which may be in conjunction with other 
exhibitions at the discretion of the Selectmen, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to print its warrants 
and its actions thereunder in the annual Town Officers' Report. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to print its valua- 
tion and tax lists. 

Article 11. To see what disposition the Town will make of 
its Dog Fund. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to choose a di- 
rector in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 128, Gen- 
eral Laws, or pass any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Five hundred seventy-live dollars ($5 75) re- 
ceived from the sale of lots and graves during the year 1939 
for the purpose provided under General Laws, Chapter 114, 
Section 15. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the 
sum of Four thousand forty-one and 64-100 dollars ($4,041.64) 
from the Highway ( Machinery Fund to the Highway Machinery 
Account, and to authorize the Selectmen to expend therefrom 
a sum for the purchase of a truck for use of the highway de- 
partment, or act anything thereon. 



14 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase from the Boston & Albany- 
Railroad- a tract of land adjacent to the Forbes Playground, 
for the purpose of erecting a building thereon to house the 
equipment of the Highway, Water, Sewer and other Town De- 
partments, or act anything thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will authorize the Water 
Commissioners to appoint one of their members to perform 
certain work in connection with the W. P. A. water project of 
19 39, and the survey of the needs of the Water Department 
as authorized by the Town in 1939 and to fix his salary. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Five hundred thirty-one and 87-100 dollars 
($531.87), this amount being the deficit on the Flanders Road 
Improvement Contract of 1937. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to improve its parking lot on the east- 
erly side. of the Town Hall, or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Five hundred dollars ($500) for the purpose 
of erecting a weather vane and gold-leafing the dome on the 
Town Hall, or act anything thereon. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to sell to George 
M. Beede a piece of land on the southerly side of Summer 
street, formerly known as the old railroad bed, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Twelve hundred dollars ($1200) to purchase 
and equip an automobile for the Police Department. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Three thousand dollars ($3,000) for the 
purpose of employing expert tree surgeons to prune and re- 
pair the shade trees in the Town, or act anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the employment of an engineer to 
work in conjunction with the W. P. A. Water Survey Project, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to install a new 
primary water supply system as formulated by the firm of 
Metcalf & Eddy and contained in the report of the Special 
Committee, appointed by the Moderator, to investigate our 
future water supply needs, and to raise and appropriate money 



15 

therefor, and determine whether the money shall be raised by- 
borrowing or otherwise, or act anything thereon. 

The polls will be open between the hours of 8.00 a. m. and 
8.00 p. m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post-Office and Town Hall in 
said town seven days, at least, before the day of holding said 
meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk of said Westborough on or 
before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-third day of February 
in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty. 

ELMER W. BENNETT, 
WENDELL F. HAYWARD, 
CHRISTOPHER J. TYRRELL, 

Selectmen of Westborough. 



Wes/tborough, Mass., February 24, 1940. 
I have this day served the within Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post-Office and Town Hall in 
said Westborough. 

THOMAS W. HU^MP^HREY, 

Constable of Westborough. 



In pursuance with the foregoing warrant, the inhabitants of 
the Town of Westborough qualified to vote in elections and 
town affairs, met in the Town Hall at 8.0 a. m. and were 
called to order by .Moderator Ellwood N. iHennessy. 

The Moderator read the Town Warrant. 

Article 2. On the motion of Gustaf H. Carlson, it was 
VOTED, unanimously, that the Town authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 19 40, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Election officers: Thomas W. Humphrey, Edward Jones, 



16 

George McDonald, Frank Fallon, Charles Schuhmann, Raymond 
Gibbons, Michael Comiskey, Francis X. Hayden, John Heffron, 
Frank Winter, William Buxton, Walter Marsh, Irving Piper, 
Edward Richard, Sr., Anne Boswell Mabel Achorn, Margaret 
Hayden, Edith Lewis, Nellie Fryer, Irene Bullard, Emma 
Haley and Lula Ashworth. 

Received of Town Clerk Annie A. Dunne, thirty-one hun- 
dred twenty (3120) ballots. 

The ballot box was examined in the presence of the voters, 
found and declared empty, was locked and the key given to 
the Constable, Thomas W. Humphrey. 

The ballots were delivered to the ballot clerks, and every- 
thing being in readiness, the polls were declared open and 
voting began. 

The polls closed at 8.00 p. m. 

The Moderator announced that Fifteen hundred and fifty- 
fix (1556) ballots had been cast and counted. The result was 
declared at 11.40 p. m. 

The vote was as follows: 

MODERATOR 

>: 'Ellwood N. Hennessy 1232 

Blanks 321 

TOWN CLERK 

*Annie A. Dunne 1379 

Blanks 177 

SELECTMAN (3 years) 

B. Howard Fay 561 

*Christopher J. Tyrrell 948 

Blanks 47 

ASSESSOR (3 years) 

*Lawrence F. Fales 786 

Patrick C. Mooney 726 

Blanks 44 

TREASURER 

*Gustaf H .Carlson 1214 

Blanks 342 



17 

TAX COLLECTOR 

*Noah F. Trank 1269 

Blanks 287 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE (3 years) 

Sylvio DiProfio 228 

♦John R. Haley 985 

William P. Kugler 240 

Blanks 103 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (3 years) 

*Sara A. Mason 1191 

Blanks 3 65 

BOARD OF HEALTH (3 years) 

Louie F. Hoffman 667 

♦Russell E. Williams 768 

Blanks 121 

TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY (3 years) 

* Katharine Maynard 1145 

♦Francis X. Reilly 1209 

*Rufus M. Shaw 1172 

Blanks' 1142 

CONSTABLES 

Raymond H. Anable 369 

♦George W. Aptt 1015 

Alfred R. Barry 162 

* Edward Braley 549 

Francis X. Casey 273 

Clyde J. Furbish 330 

♦George F. Higgins 1136 

♦Robert J. Higgins 1012 

James E. Hogan 257 

♦Thomas W. Humphrey 1349 

Maurice W. Maddocks 198 



18 



•Walter A. McTaggart 855 

;Henry L. Mutti 173 

Fred K. Nichols 512 

i 

* Charles L. Perron 999 

George A. Perry 318 

♦Winthrop H. Spinney 887 

George R. Stockwell 216 

Gordon E. Temple 210 

•Meredith W. Vinton 635 

William J. Wheble 299 

Blanks 2250 

TRUSTEE OF CEMETERIES (5 years) 

*James S. Hunter 1187 

Blanks 3 69 

WATER COMMISSIONER (3 years) 

♦Elmer W. Bennett 1173 

Blanks 383 

SEWER COMMISSIONER (3 years) 

♦Elmer W. Bennett ' 1145 

Blanks 411 

PLANNING BOARD (3 years) 

♦Frank W. Forbes 1161 

♦Victor G. Otto 1069 

Blanks 882 

TREE WARDEN 

♦George E. Hayden 1229 

Blanks 3 26 

Scattering 1 

♦Elected. 

The ballots, used and unused, together with the check lists, 



19 

were sealed, attested by the election officers and delivered to 
the Town Clerk as the law directs. 

jMeeting adjourned at 11.50 p. m. to Monday, March 18th, 
at 7.30 p. m. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



Westborough, Mass., March 18, 1940. 

The inhabitants of the Town of Westborough assembled as 
per adjournment at 7.30 p. m. and were called to order by the 
Moderator, Ellwood N. Hennessy. 

Article 1. Voted: to pass over this article. 

Article 3. Voted: that the report of the Special Water In- 
vestigating Committee be taken up and read under Article 24; 
that the reports of the several town officers as printed be ac- 
cepted, and that the report of the Finance Committee be ac- 
cepted as printed and acted upon article by article; and that 
the report of the Committee appointed to investigate the ad- 
visability and cost of a fireproof addition to the Public Library 
building to house the property of the Westborough Historical 
Society be accepted by the Town and incorporated in the an- 
nual town report together with the sketches shown on the 
screen. 

Article 4. Voted: that the Town raise and appropriate the 
following sums: 

Moderator — salary $30 00 

Selectmen — salaries $450 00 

Expenses 350 00 

800 00 

Accounting Department 1,200 00 

Town Clerk — salary $400 00 

Fees and expenses 600 00 

1,000 00 

Town Treasurer — salary $600 00 

PJxpenses 350 00 

950 00 

Tax Collector — salary $1,300 00 

Expenses 600 00 

1,900 00 

Assessors — salaries $1,500 00 

Expenses 600 00 

2,100 00 



20 

Certification of Town Notes 30 00 

Legal 500 00 

Election and Registration 1,800 00 

Town Hall 3,600 00 

Police Department 4,800 00 

Fire Department — salaries 4,970 00 

Incidentals 2,100 00 

Sealer of Weights and .Measures 135 00 

Moth Department 100 00 

Game Warden 150 00 

Forest Fires 500 00 

Dog Department 50 00 

Health Department: 

Salary — clerk $100 00 

Expenses 2,400 00 

2,500 00 



Tree Warden Department 400 00 

Animal Inspector • 225 00 

Garbage Removal 800 00 

County Tuberculosis Hospital: 

Construction $1,800 00 

Interest on bonds 777 30 

Care and maintenance 2,628 99 

5,206 29 



Sewer Department 4,000 00 

Town Dump 550 00 

Highways and Bridges 3,450 00 

Snow Removal 12,000 00 

Sidewalks 2,000 00 

Street Lighting 4,500 00 

Welfare Department — salaries $300 00 

Expenses 13,200 00 

13,500 00 



Old Age Assistance : 26,000 00 

Aid to Dependent Children 5,000 00 

Soldiers' Relief 4,000 00 

Military Aid 300 00 

State Aid 600 00 

School Department 67,500 00 

Trade School Tuition 1,000 00 

Public Library 3,300 00 

Printing Town Reports 353 55 



21 

Memorial Day Observance 300 00 

Town Insurance 3,500 00 

Unpaid 1939 bills 427 00 

Unpaid 1935 bill 102 10 

Finance Committee 125 00 

Reserve Fund 4,000 00 

Water Department — salaries $150 00 

Expenses 8,850 00 



Cemetery Department: 

Salary — clerk $150 00 

Expenses 3,300 00 



9,000 00 



3,450 00 



Interest and discount 200 00 

W. P. A. — Selectmen 5,000 00 



Total Appropriation under Article 4 $210,003 94 

Article 5. Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,200 for the employment of a nurse or nurses to be 
spent under the direction of the Board of Selectmen as pro- 
vided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 5, )Clause 21, and 
amendments thereto. 

Article 6. Voted: That the sum of $9,300 be raised and ap- 
propriated to co-operate with the State under Chapter 81, said 
sum to be used for highway purposes, provided the Town is 
not eligible to co-operate with the State under Chapter 81. 

Article 7. Voted: That the Town co-operate with the State 
and County in maintaining and repairiug and improving its 
Chapter 9 highways, and that the sum of $1,000 be raised 
and appropriated for this purpose. 
Article 8. Voted: To pass over this article. 

Article 9. Voted: That the Town authorize its Selectmen 
to print its warrants and its action thereunder in the annual 
Town Officers' Report. 

Article 10. Voted: That the Town authorize the Assessors 
to print its valuation and tax list. 

Article 11. Voted: That the sum of $923.67, which is the 
amount of the dog fund, be appropriated for the use of the 
Public Library. 

Article 12. Voted: That the Town choose a Director in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of this article and that same be 
appointed by the Moderator. 



22 

Article 13. Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of 
$5 75, received from the sale of lots and graves during the 
year 1939, for the purpose provided under General Laws, 
Chapter 114, Section 15. 

Article 14. Voted: That the sum of $4,041.64 be trans- 
ferred from the Highway Machinery Fund to the Highway Ma- 
chinery Account, and that the Selectmen be authorized to ex- 
pend therefrom a sum of money not to exceed the sum of 
$1,000 for the purchase of a truck for the use of the High- 
way Department and that the Selectmen be further authorized 
to turn in one truck unit at its turn-in value. 

Article 15. Voted: To pass over this article. 

Article 16. Voted: To authorize the Water Commissioners 
to appoint one of their members to perform certain work in 
connection with the W. P. A. Water Project of 1939 and the 
survey of the needs of the Water Department as authorized 
by the Town in 1939; the compensation for such services not 
to exceed the sum of $94.50. 

Article 17. Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of 
$531.87, this amount being the deficit on the Flanders Road 
Improvement Contract of 19 37. 

Article 18. Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of 
$950 to improve the parking lot on the easterly" side of the 
Town Hall. 

Article 19. Voted: That the sum of $500 be raised and 
appropriated for the purpose of erecting a weather vane and 
gold leafing the dome of the Town Hall. 

Article 20. Voted: To authorize the Selectmen to sell to 
George M. Beede a tract of land as described in a plan on file 
in the office of the Selectmen, containing 222 square feet more 
or less, abutting Summer street, said sale not to exceed the 
land now leased to George M. Beede, at a price 'satisfactory 
to the Selectmen. 

Article 21. Voted: To pass over this article. 

Article 2 2. Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of 
$3,000 for the purpose of employing expert tree surgeons for 
the purpose of pruning and repairing the shade trees in the 
Town. 

Article 23. Voted: That the sum of $600 be raised and ap- 
propriated for the purpose of employing an engineer to work 
in conjunction with the W. P. A. Water Survey Project. 

Voted: To adjourn until Monday, April 15th, at 7.30 p. m., 



23 

and that the reading of the Water Investigating Committee's 
report and action under Article 2 4 be taken up at that time. 

Judge Lewis gave notice that he would move for recon- 
sideration of Article 20 at the adjourned Town Meeting to 
be held on April 15th. 

Mr. Walsh gave notice that he would move for reconsidera- 
tion of the item for Street Lighting under Article 4. 

Meeting adjourned at 9.55 p. m. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO INVESTI- 
GATE THE ADVISABILITY AND COST OF A FIRE 
PROOF ADDITION TO THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 
1BUILDING TO HOUSE THE PROPERTY OF THE 
WESTBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The Article in the Town Warrant calling for the appoint- 
ment of a Committee to investigate the advisability and cost 
of a fire proof addition to the Public Library building to house 
the property of the Westborough Historical Society, had its in- 
ception in the minds of some citizens who realized the prac- 
tical value to Westborough, as to every community, of the 
close correlation of the activities of its Historical Society, its 
Public Library and its Public School system. The 1500 and 
more volumes of the Historical Society library should be 
readily accessible to patrons of the Public Library interested 
in the history of this and neighboring towns, in genealogy, 
music and other subjects. Its collection of manuscripts, print- 
ed records and relics, which preserve every decade of the 
Town's history, every period and phase of its life from the 
first settlement to the present time, should be readily avail- 
able for exhibits in connection with the celebration of national 
holidays in the schools, with courses in history, the study of 
the evolution of home and factory industries, of tools, of heat- 
ing and lighting apparatus, cooking utensils. Such correla- 
tion can be effectively carried on only when the three institu- 
tions are located near one another. 

The Committee investigated the possibility of an addition 
to the Public Library building which would not be out of 
harmony with its architecture. Such an addition is a possi- 
bility. 



The Committee then investigated the possibility of a sepa- 
rate fire proof building for the Historical Society in the vi- 
cinity of the Public Library and the Schools. And as a means 
of testing this possibility, the Committee secured, without ex- 
pense to the Town or to the Historical Society, a plan of such 
building, slides of which will be thrown on the screen. 

It is the judgment of the Committee that such a separate 
building erected by a fund established by the Historical So- 
ciety and contributed to by citizens of the Town would best 
serve the interests of the Town and the Historical Society. 

The Committee, therefore, report that a fire proof addition 
to the Public Library building to house the property of the 
Historical Society is not advisable. 

Committee: 

FRANK W. FORBES. 
EVERETT I. SWAN. 
CORA A. NEWTON. 



Westborough, Mass., April 9, 1940. 
At a meeting of the Selectmen, at which Deputy Sheriff 
Banfill and the Town (Clerk were present, the name of Lester 
H. Bombard was drawn for Jury Duty. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



Westborough, Mass., April 15, 1940. 

The inhabitants of the Town of Westborough assembled as 
per adjournment at 7.30 p. m. and were called to order by 
the Moderator, Ellwood N. Hennessy. 

Voted: That Judge Lewis' motion for reconsideration of 
Article 20 be laid on the table. 

Voted: Not to reconsider the item for Street Lighting under 
Article 4. 

Article 2 4. Voted: That a committee of five be appointed 
by the Moderator to get bids and bring in definite costs to 
complete the approximate plans submitted by the Engineers 
under Tables H and J of their report of ( March 30th to the 
Water Investigating Committee, this report to be presented 
at the next Annual Town Meeting; and that the present Com- 






* * ; ^ y 





Exterior View 




Main Entrance 



VM ILl:J' 

OH 




•U 



■;Msf\ 



Exhibition Room witi 



i Fireplace 



25 

mittee be extended a vote of thanks and that their report be 
accepted by the Town. 

Meeting adjourned at 10.20 p. m. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



Westborough, Mass., May 9, 19 40. 
The Moderator this day made the following appointments: 
Committee of five appointed under Article 24 (Water Investi- 
gating Committee): William C. Blois, Chairman, Francis J. 
Sill, Howard S. Foster, Donald B. Wilson and Charles F. 
Houlden. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



26 



Town Meeting May 20, 1 940 



TOWN WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Worcester, ss. 

To any Constable of the Town of Westborough, in the County 
of Worcester, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are directed to notify and warn the Inhabitants of the Town 
of Westborough, qualified to vote in elections and town affairs, 
to meet in the Town Hall, in Westborough, on Monday, the 
twentieth day of May, A. D. 1940, at 7.30 o'clock in the after- 
noon, then and there to act on the following article: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum of money for W. P. A. Projects or act any- 
thing thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post-Office and Town Hall in 
said town seven days, at least, before the day of holding said 
meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk of said Westborough on or 
before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this tenth day of May in the year 
of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty. 

WENDELL F. HAYWARD, 
CHRISTOPHER J. TYRRELL, 
ELMER W. BENNETT, 

Selectmen of Westborougk, 



27 

Worcester, ss>. Westborough, Mass., May 11, 19 40. 

I have this day served the within Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post Office and Town Hall in 
said Westborough. 

THOMAS W. HUMPHREY, 

Constable of Westborough. 



Westborough, Mass., May 20, 19 40. 
In pursuance with the foregoing warrant, the inhabitants of 
the Town of Westborough qualified to vote in elections and 
town affairs, met in the Town Hall at 7.30 p. m. and were 
called to order by Moderator Ellwood N. iHennessy. 
The Moderator read the Town Warrant. 

Article 1. Voted: That the sum of $5,000 be appropriated 
for W. P. A. projects, to be expended under the supervision 
of the Selectmen, this amount to be taken from the Excess 
and Deficiency Fund. 

Meeting adjourned at 7.35 p. m. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



Westborough, Mass., June 22, 1940. 
The Moderator this day made the following appointments: 
Finance Committee for three years: Howard P. Gilmore, 
Leonard M. Krull and Ralph S. Tyler. 

Town Forest Committee for three years: Noah Nason. 
Director in accordance with Chapter 128, General Laws: 
Ada Fenno. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



Westborough, jMass., July 23, 1940. 
At a meeting of the Board of Selectmen, at which the Town 
Clerk and Deputy Sheriff Banfill were present, the name of 
Ralph W. Frantz was drawn for Jury Duty. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



28 

Westborough, Mass., Aug. 13, 1940. 
At a meeting of the Board of Selectmen, at which the Town 
Clerk and Deputy Sheriff Hayden were present, the name of 
William M. Elliott was drawn for Jury Duty. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



29 



Town Meeting Septem ber 9, 1 940 



TOWN WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

< i i 

Worcester, ss. 

To any Constable of the Town of Westborough, in the County 
of Worcester, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are directed to notify and warn the Inhabitants of the Town 
of Westborough, qualified to vote in elections and town affairs, 
to meet in the Town Hall, in Westborough, on Monday, the 
ninth day of September, A. D. 1940, at 7.30 o'clock in the after- 
noon, then and there to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money for the Tree Warden, or act anything thereon. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum 
of money from the Snow Removal appropriation account to 
the Highway Machinery account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum 
of money from the Highway Machinery Fund to the Highway 
Machinery account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Special Water Committee, appointed under Article 24 at the 
adjourned town meeting held April 15, 19 40, to broaden the 
scope of their investigation of the present water system and 
make a report on our future water supply needs, the Com- 
mittee to report at the next annual town meeting, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a 



30 

sum of money for W. P. A. projects, or act anything thereon. 
And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post-Office and Town Hall in 
said town seven days, at least, before the day of holding said 
meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk of said Westborough on or 
before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-seventh day of August 
in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty. 

WENDELL F. HAYWARD, 
ELMER W. BENNETT, 
CHRISTOPHER J. TYRRELL, 

Selectmen of Westborough. 



Worcester, ss. Westborough, Mass., August 27, 1940. 

I have this day served the within Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post Office and Town Hall in 
said Westborough. 

THOMAS W. HUMPHREY, 

Constable of Westborough. 



Westborough, Mass., September 9, 1940. 

In pursuance with the foregoing warrant, the inhabitants of 
the Town of Westborough qualified to vote in elections and 
town affairs, met in the Town Hall at 7.30 p. m. and were 
called to order by Moderator Ellwood N. Hennessy. 

The Moderator read the Town Warrant. 

Article 1. Voted: That the sum of $400 be appropriated 
for the use of the Tree Warden, this amount to be taken from 
the Excess and Deficiency Account. 

Article 2. Voted: To pass over this article. 

Article 3. Voted: That the sum of $4,400 be transferred 
from the Highway Machinery Fund to the Highway jMachinery 
Account, and that the Selectmen be authorized to expend there- 
from the sum of $450 towards the purchase of a truck. 

Article 4. Voted: That the sum of $1,000 be transferred 
from the Excess and Deficiency Account so as to enable the 
Committee to hire an Engineer that they may broaden the, 



31 

scope of their investigation of the present water system and 
make a report on our future water supply needs at the next 
Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 5. Voted: That the sum of $3,5 00 be made avail- 
able under this article, to be transferred from the following 
accounts: $1,000 from the Aid to Dependent Children account, 
and $2,500 from the Excess and Deficiency Revenue account. 

Meeting adjourned at 8.00 p. m. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



Westborough, Mass., September 24, 1940. 
At a meeting of the Board of Selectmen, at which the Town 
Clerk and Deputy Sheriff Hayden were present, the name of 
Roger W. Beaman was drawn for Jury Duty. 

Attest: ANNIE A. DUNNE, 

Town Clerk. 



Report of Town Clerk 



VITAL STATISTICS 

There have been 77 births recorded, of which 35 were 
males and 42 were females. Of this number 67 were born 
outside of Westborough. 

There have been 65 marrioges recorded, of which 35 
were performed in other cities or towns. 

There Was a total of 239 deaths recorded, of which 168 
occurred at the Westborough State Hospital. Of this num- 
ber 42 were caused by accident or other causes requiring 
investigation by the Medical Examiner. 

DOG LICENSES 

.Male 271 

Female 60 

Spayed Female 74 

Kennel 4 

Total number of licenses* 409 

Paid to Town Treasurer $1,058 20 



33 

SPORTING LICENSES 

Resident Citizens' Fishing 133 

Resident Citizens' Hunting 98 

Resident Citizens' Sporting 82 

Women's and Minors' Fishing 30 

Resident Citizens' Trapping 3 

Sporting (free) 13 

Duplicates for lost licenses 3 

Special Non-resident Fishing 3 

Non-resident Hunting 1 

Total number of licenses 3 66 

Paid to Division of Fisheries and Game $710 50 



ANNIE A. DUNNE, Town Clerk. 



34 



Report of the School Committee 



ORGANIZATION 

Charles A. Kimball, Chairman Term expires 1942 

Mrs. Sara. A. Mason, Secretary Term expires 1943 

Harry E. Burroughs Term expires 1941 

Regular meetings of the Committee are held the 
second Monday of each month at 8 p. m. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

J. Harding Armstrong Superintendent 

Office, High School. Tel. 2 231 

Office Hours: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, 3 to 5 p. m. 

Residence, 14 Church St. Tel. 5 43 

Dr. Walter F. Mahoney School Physician 

Residence, 61 West Main St. Tel. 8 05 

Helen L. Schuhmann, R. N School Nurse 

Residence, 11 Ruggles St. Tel. 685 

James H. Higgins .. Attendance Officer and Census Enumerator 

Residence, 21 Beach St. Tel. 223 3 

SCHOOL CALENDAR — 19 41 

Winter term, Jan. 2-Feb. 21; Spring terms, March 3-April 18 

and April 2 8-June 20; Fall term, Sept. 3-Dec. 19 

School Holidays — Good Friday, Memorial Day, Columbus Day, 

Armistice Day, Thanksgiving Day and the following Friday 

NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 

This signal is 1-2-3 on the Westboro fire alarm, given three 
times. When sounded at 7.3 it means no morning or after- 
noon sessiions for all schools; at 8 o'clock, no morning session 
for first six grades only; at 11.30, no afternoon session for all 
schools; at 11.45, no afternoon session for first six grades only. 



35 

To the Town of Westborough ■ 

The School Committee respectfully submits the follow- 
ing- report for the year ending December 31, 1940. 

The sum of $1,249.27 was expended for repairs, the major 
part of which was for painting. The Committee began to 
carry out the plan suggested last year for the renovation 
of the interior of the high school by having all the rooms 
on the top floor painted, the ceilings whitened and the 
woodwork varnished. It will probably take three more 
years to complete the entire building. In addition the 
four rooms on the first floor of the Eli "Whitney school were 
also thoroughly renovated. Miscellaneous repairs included 
the painting of some of the toilets and the rennishing of 
the desks in several rooms in the high school. 

At the close of school in June the four boilers were in- 
spected and given the usual thorough cleaning and such 
repairs as were necessary. An incinerator was constructed 
in the base of the chimney at the high school. This makes 
it possible for the janitor to dispose of paper and similar 
waste material without burning it on the top of the fire, 
which makes a dirty fire and results in loss of fuel. 

The most important equipment purchased during the 
year was two of the latest types of electric stoves, which 
replaced the ones originally installed in the high school 
when it was built 14 years ago. This was done on an ex- 
change basis at a cost of only $175. A set of ten new cur- 
tains was purchased to replace some which were worn out 
by constant use in the rooms on the side of the building 
most exposed to the sun. 

This coming year in addition to continuing the renova- 
tion of the interior of the high school, broken walks at the 
rear should be replaced. In our report of last year a state- 
ment was made regarding the plans developed for improv- 
ing the Eli Whitney and Harvey grounds with W. P. A. 
assistance. We urge that this project be carried out just 



36 

as soon as the necessary arrangements can be made with 
the proper authorities. 

In order to add to the high school program more subjects 
of a practical nature as suggested by the superintendent 
in his report it will be necessary to employ another teacher 
to take over the academic subjects now being taught by the 
commercial, home economics and manual training teachers. 
We think that at this time there is a real need for expand- 
ing the program in this way and the budget presented to 
the Finance Committee will include the cost of this addi- 
tional teacher 

Your attention is called to the accompanying reports 
of the superintendent and other school officials, which give 
some of the most important phases of: the year's work. 

Kespectfully submitted,, 

CHARLES A. KIMBALL, Chairman. 
SARA A. MASON, Secretary. 
HARRY E. BURROUGHS. 

School Committee. 



37 



Report of Superintendent of Schools 



To the Westborough School Committee: 

I submit for your consideration the following report of 
the activities of the schools for the year 1940 which I trust 
will also prove of interest to citizens of our town. 
Our Schools and the National Crisis 

Much has been written regarding the responsibility of the 
schools in the present national crisis but the determination 
of just what our small school system can do to help in a 
practical way is a diificult matter. The most pressing im- 
mediate need is to train workers for the war industries but 
while our high school gives more training in hand skills in 
our shop than do most small schools yet we are not equipped 
to give the special vocational training necessary for these 
workers. Even with federal aid the expense of the equip- 
ment necessary for such a program would be prohibitive 
for a school of our size. Therefore, our boys and men who 
wish this kind of training must secure it at the Worcester 
Trade School or in other centers being established in 
larger places for this specialized work. 

In this emergency much emphasis is being laid on the 
attitudes and qualities of character shown by our people 
and that they are of vital importance is evidenced by the 
occurrences in European countries during the past few 
months. Our schools here have always laid stress on these 
factors as an essential part of the training of our boys and 



38 

girls through our character training program. 

Recognizing thai in this crisis there was need for special 
emphasis on the development of a better type of patriotism, 
at the firsl teachers' meeting in the fall this was presented 
as an objective on which all teachers should center their 
attention. Specific suggestions were made as to how this 
might be accomplished and everyone in the system is mak- 
ing a definite attempt to strengthen the civic loyalties of all 
the pupils. Three fundamental factors are being stressed, 
namely: — the appreciation of the opportunities which our 
country offers, the need of giving up personal desires for 
the good of the group, and the necessity for obedience to au- 
thority and to the laws under which we live. 

Teaching Staff 

This year has seen more changes in our teaching staff 
than at any other time, six teachers or one-fifth of the 
entire corps ending their services in June. Two were 
granted leaves of absence, Mr. Donald Homans, assistant 
principal at the high school, to study at Harvard and Miss 
Florence AValker, the junior high mathematics teacher, to 
teach in an American school near Peking, China, Mr. Clyde 
Riley has been assigned most of the duties of the assistant 
principal and Mr. Albert J. Doran, Jr., a graduate of 
Boston University, was elected to take over the classes 
taught by Mr. Homans. Mr. Ralph M. Clark, a Trinity 
College graduate with several years experience, was se- 
lected to take Miss Walker's place. Miss Elizabeth Kane 
who has taught the first grade at the Eli Whitney School 
for several years was transferred to the junior high school 
to teach geography, drawing and music in place of Miss 
Wright who resigned. 

Miss Frances Conlin, the teacher of history in the junior 
high and Miss Ruth Gurnett, one of the third grade teach- 
ers, resigned to be married. Mr. Alton C. Bennett, a recent 



39 

Tufts College graduate, was chosen to succeed Miss Con- 
lin and also to serve as assistant football and baseball 
coach. Miss Marjorie Knight, a graduate of Fitchburg 
Teachers College who had taught in New Hampshire was 
selected to succeed Miss Gurnett. 

• Miss Martha Manahan, a graduate of Lowell State Teach- 
ers ? College, was appointed to fill the fifth grade vacancy 
caused by the transfer of Miss Kane. Late in the summer 
Miss Drury resigned to accept a position in Winchester 
and Miss Margaret Gleason, a graduate of our high school 
and of Framingham Teachers' College, was chosen for the 
position. Just before the Christmas vacation,, Miss Winni- 
fred Granger, the clothing and home economics teacher in 
the high school secured a better position in New Canaan, 
Conn, and in order that she might accept it at once Mrs. 
Louis Farnsworth has been employed as a substitute 
teacher. 

All these new appointments were made only after a very 
careful consideration of the qualifications of many candi- 
dates and they are proving well qualified for the positions 
to which they have been assigned. It is indeed surprising 
how successfully the regular program of work has been 
carried on with these numerous changes in personnel. 

School Progress 

It is difficult to measure the progress being made from 
year to year by a school system and often times more is 
gained by carefully following procedures already estab- 
lished than by making changes. During the past year no 
changes of special importance have been made and whatever 
advance has been accomplished has been due to more care- 
ful execution of plans already developed. 

In the junior-senior high school a few changes have been 
made in the text books, the most important being the intro- 
duction in the junior high of a reader designed to develop 



40 

the fundamental reading skills so necessary for the high 
school pupil. The change in teachers made possible some 
minor adjustments in the program which have been ad- 
vantageous. 

The guidance program inaugurated a year ago has been 
continued successfully, some adjustments being made in 
the topics discussed to better fit the needs and interests of 
the various classes. 

The formation of proper study habits is essential to suc- 
cessful high school work and the faculty has given special 
attention to this problem the past year. Home study is an- 
other important matter which has been given serious con- 
sideration for some time and plans have been discussed 
for changing the school program so as to have most of the 
study work done in school but no satisfactory solution has 
been developed. 

During the past year the New England College Certifi- 
cate Board renewed our certification privilege and the 
State Department of Education gave our school a Grade A. 
rating. These make it possible for graduates whose marks 
are A or B for their entire high school course to enter the 
New England colleges and the state teachers' colleges with- 
out examinations. 



The work of the elementary grades has gone on success- 
fully during the year with special attention given to im- 
proving the teaching of reading. After careful study of 
the latest books in this field, a series known as the Child 
Development Readers, published by Houghton Mifflin Co. 
was adopted and sets have been purchased for use in grades 
three, four, five and six. The material in these texts is so 
organized that definite reading skills can be developed in 
each grade and the work carried on progressively from 
year to year. The children have been grouped on the 



41 

basis of their reading ability and special instruction is 
given according to the needs of each group. This plan 
has resulted in a definite improvement of the reading 
ability of the children as shown by the reading tests given, 
at the close of the year. 

In this connection mention should be made of the un- 
usually successful outside reading program being carried 
on with the fine cooperation of the librarians at the town 
library. Miss Ainsworth, the children's librarian, has 
been most helpful and many boys and girls in the upper 
elementary classes have won the state reading certificates 
for reading ten or twenty books. During the past year 
these awards have been given to fifty-five children. 

The age for entrance to the first grade was again ad- 
vanced a month so that a child had to be five years old on 
February 1st to be admitted. The plan of giving special 
tests to children whose birthdays came before April 1st 
was continued and several were admitted on the recom- 
mendation of the examiners. 

The introduction of a series of science readers stimulat- 
ed much interest in this subject and in the spring a weekly 
display of newly-found flowers was prepared by the chil- 
dren and exhibited in the library under the direction of 
Miss Cummings. In the fall a successful flower-arrange- 
ment contest was also held at the Eli Whitney School and 
during the winter much interest has been shown in class- 
room acquariums. 

In all these grades much attention has been given to 
the teaching of safety and the safety patrol made up of the 
older Eli Whitney boys has been most helpful in controlling 
the crossing of the main highways by the children going 
home from school. This is a most serious problem but es- 
pecially bicycle safety which should receive more attention 
by parents. Because of the traffic hazards around the 
schools, especially at noon, children shold not be allowed to 
ride their bicycles to school unless they live at considerable 



42 

distance from the buildings. There have been numerous 
eases of narrow escapes from serious accidents to children 
1 Lding bicycles to school. 

Dining the past two years the pupils of the Eli Whit- 
ney School have earned over .$200 chiefly through the sale 
of seeds, a large part of which has been expended for 
special equipment for the school. They have also given 
generously to the Red Cross and other relief organizations 
and are to be commended for the fine spirit of thought- 
fulness which they have shown so often. 

Records of the High School Graduates 

The records made by the graduates of our school in col- 
leges and other schools for specialized training is an im- 
portant indication of the thoroughness of the training 
which is given in the high school. It is customary for 
these schools and colleges to send to the high school copies 
of the marks attained by their graduates during the first 
half year of their attendance. 

The last scholarship reports received were for the gradu- 
ates entering various institutions in the fall of 1939. 
Twenty-four young people, most of them graduates of 
June 1939, were enrolled as members of the first year 
classes in sixteen different colleges and schools where they 
took a total of 150 different subjects. Their marks were 
distributed as follows:— A, 23 or 15 3-10%; B, 43 or 28 
6-10% ; C, 54 or 36% ; D, 26 or 17 3-10%; E, 3 or 2% 
ana Fail, 1 or 6-10%. As E in this scale indicates a con- 
dition, there was only one actual failure in the one hun- 
dred fifty marks reported and this was by a person who 
graduated three years before. 

Only five of these graduates entered institutions of 
strictly college grade directly from our high school with- 
out any additional training. All five graduated with honor 
records and were admitted to college without any exami- 
nations. They received twent-nine marks distributed as 
follows: A, 7 or 24% ; B, 11 or 38% ; C. 7 or 24% ; D, 4 
or 14%. 



43 

These figures show very clearly that our high school 
gives adequate training for continued study at higher in- 
stitutions of various types and that honor pupils are fully 
able to meet the severe standards set by our New England 
colleges and technical schools. 

Health Activities 

The plans inaugurated last year as a result of the sur- 
vey of our health program by officials of the State Board 
of Health have been successfully continued. The new 
method for conducting the annual physical examinations 
has proved especially advantageous. Through the co- 
operative efforts of Dr. Mahoney, the school physician, 
Mrs. Schuhmann, the nurse, and the physical instructor, 
Mr. Fisher and his assistant, Miss Stead, we have a health 
program which is most beneficial to our boys and girls. 

A definite advance step has been taken this year by your 
committee in establishing the requirement that hereafter 
all newly appointed teachers must have a thorough chest 
examination before fully qualifying for their positions. 
Through the cooperation of Dr. Glidden arrangements have 
been made to have this done at the county sanatorium with- 
out cost. All new teachers employed this year passed these 
tests before beginning their work in September. 

Nutrition is one of the most important factors in a health 
program and the federal government has sought to encour- 
age interest in it by furnishing some of its surplus com- 
modities for school lunches. For some time we have tried 
to make arrangements for serving fruits in various forms 
at noon to the children at the Eli Whitney and Harvey 
Schools who bring their lunches. Final plans for this 
service have been completed and it will be started with 
the opening of the new term. Its extension will depend 



44 

on t he success of this first venture and the assistance we 
are able to secure to carry it on. 

The plan for conducting our dental clinic has not 
proved satisfactory chiefly because the local dentists have 
been unable to give the time required for this service. With 
their approval plans were made with, the cooperation of 
the Worcester County Extension Service to have this work 
done by a dentist in their employ. In the spring he came 
for the first time and conducted the clinic for a week, being 
on duty during the entire school sessions. In this way 
much more work was accomplished than ever before and 
the program has proved so satisfactory that the Child 
Health Committee voted to continue it. Dr. Merrill came 
again in the fall and the results obtained were even more 
gratifying. While this arrangement has greatly improved 
the conduct of our dental program, as has been stated be- 
fore, this work should be carried on by employing a school 
dentist under the direction of the Board of Health. 

The service rendered by the school nurse is one of the 
most important parts of our health program. Her con- 
tacts with both school and home make possible the solution 
of many individual health problems aifecting not only 
school attendance but also the well-being of the children. 
As in the past Mrs. Schuhmann has carried on her many 
activities with conscientious efficiency. The following sum- 
mary indicates the importance of her work : 

Home calls (personal visits) 206 

Number of pupils inspected 1208 

Number immunized against diphtheria 76 

Pre-school children 57 

School pupils 19 

Hospital calls 8 

Number taken to hospital for tonsil 

operations 14 

Assistance at Well Child Clinics 10 

Dental Clinics 23 y 2 days 

Number pupils having work done 222 



45 

Number dental certificates awarded 162 

Contagious diseases 78 

(measles, 1; mumps, 1; scarlet fever, 3; 
chicken pox, 73) 

Recreation Program 

Through the generosity of Mrs. Florence Ayer the recre- 
ation program, started last year has been continued with 
Mr. Willard Gr. Patton again serving as director. The suc- 
cess of this venture is largely due to his skill and good 
judgment not only in setting up and conducting an excel- 
lent program but also in dealing with the many personali- 
ties involved. He has won the respect and confidence of 
all groups participating in the program and he is deserv- 
ing of special commendation for the fine service he is ren- 
dering our community. 

His detailed statement regarding the activities of this 
new program is included in this report and merits the 
careful consideration of everyone. The surprisingly large 
number of participants is evidence that there is a real 
need for this program. These young people have had en- 
joyment,, physical activity and recreation under whole- 
some conditions and they have been greatly benefitted 
thereby. 

The question of making this program a permanent re- 
sponsibility of the community should receive the careful 
consideration of the citizens. It is too much to expect it 
to be supported indefinitely with private funds. Many who 
have been in closest touch with the movement feel that it 
should receive the financial support of the town because it 
has proved such an effective center for the recreational ac- 
tivities of so many of our young people. This can be done 
most economically by continuing the present plan by which 
it is one of the functions of the School Department and by 
increasing the annual school appropriation sufficiently to 
furnish the necessary funds. 



46 
Music and Drawing 

The interest of our boys and girls in these two subjects 
and the enjoyment which they receive from them is largely 
due to the successful manner in which the work is con- 
ducted by the two supervisors, Mrs. Andrews and Mrs. 
Ling. 

The following statements are taken from their reports: 

The music course is so planned that each year every child 
is given the working tools necessary for him to make pro- 
gressive gains in the ability to sing and listen intelligently. 
The number of children who show no ability to sing even 
after years of careful teaching is very small. 

The elementary grade children have had some experience 
singing before larger gronps through the programs given 
at Christmas in the high school auditorium and in the town 
hall just before Memorial Day. 

The Girls' Chorus at the high school has had a large and 
enthusiastic membership. It has provided music for many 
of the assemblies, gave a special program for the Woman's 
Club and united with the senior class in preparing music 
at graduation. 

With the resignation of Miss Conlin the high school or- 
chestra was left without a leader and up to the present 
time no one has been found to take her place. The nnmber 
of pupils interested in instrumental music is very small but 
it is hoped that this valuable part of our musical program 
can be continued in the near future. 

In drawing the pupils are allowed and encouraged to 
branch out in their interpretation of the assignments given 
by the teacher, thus developing much individuality in the 
work. There has been considerable correlation of the 
drawing with the regular class work. Only a very few 
high school pupils can arrange their schedules to fit the 
limited number of drawing periods available, hence those 
with both interest and ability in this subject can obtain 



47 

very little training. This is a situation which should be 
remedied as soon as possible. Three of our recent gradu- 
ates are studying in art schools of various kinds indicating 
that this subject has a definite vocational value. 

Several fine exhibits have been arranged this year in 
addition to those of the drawings of our own children. Es- 
pecially interesting were those from the Providence Cen- 
tral High School, the Arlington High School and the work 
done by Charles Walkup, Jr., at the Massachusetts School 
of Art. 

Miscellaneous Items 

Special recognition of American Education Week was 
again made by arranging exhibits of school work, by in- 
viting visitors and by holding an evening session for con- 
ferences of parents and teachers. Many parents came to 
the schools during the week and the contacts thus estab- 
lished proved mutually helpful. As the same week was 
also National Book Week the importance of books was 
emphasized by placing exhibits of textbooks in three store 
windows and by the presentation of tableaus showing 
famous book characters as part of a program given by the 
high scchool pupils in the auditorium the night of the eve- 
ning session. These activities gave parents and citizens 
an opportunity to better understand the school life of our 
children. 



The fine professional spirit of our teachers has been 
shown not only by their careful attention to their regular 
teaching responsibilities but also by their plans for pro- 
fessorial improvement. All are members of the Massachu- 
setts Teachers' Federation and a larger number than ever 
before have joined the National Education Association. 



48 

Every teacher in the Eli Whitney School has joined this or- 
ganization thus making it the only 100% membership school 
in town. 



The encouragement and financial support given to vari- 
ous school activities by organizations and individuals of 
our community have been most helpful. Special mention 
should be made of the assistance given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Forbes, Dr. and Mrs, Ayer, the Woman's Club, the Ameri- 
can Legion, the Kiwanis Club, the Salvation Army and 
the Child Health Committee. Their cooperation in making 
possible services not supported directliy by the town are 
very much appreciated. 

Conclusion 

As you well know, for some time I have been urging that 
another man be added to our high school faculty in order 
that our program may be broadened. Last year the salary 
item in our budget was increased sufficiently to make this 
possible but the full appropriation which we requested was 
not granted, hence this step could not be taken. Under 
present conditions the need is even greater than before 
because of the demand for more practical training of our 
high school pupils to meet the present emergency. Only 
by adding this teacher can we extend the work already be- 
ing done in the vocational courses which have more direct 
value to the great majority of our pupils. Again, I earn- 
estly recommend that another male teacher be added to 
our high school staff. 

The plan for raising the age for entrance to Grade 1 is 
proving very satisfactory and I recommend that this be 



49 

extended one more month. This will make the final age 
requirement 5 years on the January 1st preceding the open- 
ing of school,, or 5 years 8 months September 1st. 

The progress made during the past year is due to your 
thoughtful decisions regarding the many important ques- 
tions which have arisen and to the fine cooperative spirit 
shown by all members of the department. For these con- 
ditions I am personally most appreciative. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. HARDING ARMSTRONG. 
January 10, 1941. 



50 



Report of School Physician 



The 1940 school medical examinations showed the fol- 
lowing results: 



Tonsils and adenoids 


110 


Defective hearts 


36 


Defective teeth 


215 


Arches 


34 


Number examined 


785 



Some of these heart cases were of the functional type 
and could be completely repaired if given proper medical 
attention. Notice cards advising this were sent to the pa- 
rents of all these cases. 

There are still too many children with defective teeth 
and enlarged tonsils, both of which, are capable of causing 
organic disease in other organs and we strongly advise 
parents to have these corrected. 

DE. WALTER F. MAHONEY, 

School Physician. 



Report Department Physical Education 



Physical Education, due to the conscription and the re- 
sultant emphasis on health and well being, will be elevat- 
ed to a more prominent position in our educational system 
within the next few years. The attention focused on 
physical fitness for all branches of the United States ser- 
vice is bound to be reflected in our school health and 
physical education setup. I look for increased interest, 
especially by the young men in our public schools and 
colleges, in all forms of physical education. 

The past year has been productive of some very fine 
athletic programs for botli boys and. gir]s in our Westboro 
schools. With the construction of the asphalt tennis courts 
on Forbes Field interest and attendance in this activity 
for the young ladies has doubled. Miss Stead reports that 
she has found it difficult to schedule the use of the courts 
due to the increased demand. Many girls now have their 
own racquets, though this equipment is supplied to all who 
do not have them. The athletic association provides ten- 
nis balls for instruction and play. 

Interest in girls basketball has been on the upgrade for 
some time. Last season Miss Stead had representative 
teams from all four senior high classes play contests with 
like teams from Ashland, Framingham and Auburn, while 
varsity and junior varsity quintets competed with Upton, 
Shrewsbury and Auburn. Victories over Upton and 



52 

Shrewsbury were very pleasant occasions for the maroon 
clad lassies. 

The hoys' basketball teams, varsity, junior varsity and 
freshman, enjoyed very successful seasons. Coach Clyde 
Riley's Jay Vees won 17 and lost but 2 games, while the 
varsity won 17 and last 5. This team entered the Clark 
Tournament, but was eliminated in the semi-finals by 
Northbridge High, the finalist. 

In other sports football and golf, enthusiasm was high. 
Football gave us a 7 win, 1 tie and 2 defeat record, while 
our golf team finished in a tie for 2nd place in the Bay 
State League with Dedham High. Our baseball season 
was not as successful as the other sports. 

I wish to acknowledge the splendid work of Mr. Alton 
Bennett, who assisted me in football, and Mr. Clyde Riley 
and Mr. Albert Doran in basketball. I feel that the school 
committee made a very wise move in securing the services 
of additional men teachers capable of handling physical 
extra-curricular activities with our boys. 

M}^ appreciation and thank? to Dr. Mahoney for his care 
of our football injuries, also to Mr. Robert Johnson, Mr. 
LeBeau and Mr. Forbush for making the field playable on 
Thanksgiving Day. Thanks also to Mr. Walter Meigs for 
his gift of second hand bowling pins, which are used in 
our recreational program. 

In 1927, with the help of boys from our manual train- 
ing department. I took over and cleaned a basement room 
in the Eli Whitney school for a small gymnasium. A few 
pieces of apparatus were constructed and installed. Since 
that time we have ^dded many features, such as small 
climbing ropes, horizontal ladders, balance beam, vaulting 
box, boom, mats, recreation room with games such as teni- 
quoit, golf putting, paddle badminton, shuffle-board, 
shufflle-pin, bowling alley, quoits and box hockey. We 
now have added another interesting piece of equipment, 






53 

a climbing peg board. This vertical board, ten inches 
wide reaches to the ceiling and has two rows of holes 
eight inches apart. The object of the piece is to have a 
child climb the board by using two nine inch wooden pegs 
inserting them one at a time in the alternating holes. At 
the top of the board is a bell which is to be tapped by the 
climber when successful in getting to the top. 

During vacation the wooden lockers in the Eli Whitney 
gym were given a coat of aluminum paint and all floor 
lines touched up. We are planning on installing six new 
ropes to replace the old ones that have become worn out. 
Our gymnasium-play room setup is almost complete and 
has attracted quite a bit of attention. Numerous visits 
from physical education teachers have been paid. Mr. 
Ralph Colson, assistant state supervisor of physical edu- 
cation, spent one whole day looking over our work and was 
so pleased with the novelty of the Eli Whitney gymnasium 
that he asked me to write up this work in detail for his 
state publication. 

This department has been helped by the construction, 
through the efforts of Mr. Paul Moran, of a new Softball 
backstop on our high school play area. Also the installa- 
tion of a new type electric light bulb in the gymnasium 
has been very beneficial. 

I feel that greater efficiency would be obtained in our 
department if the following suggestions were carried out. 

1. Install one set of the new fan type basketball back- 
stops. These are official and all steel. 

2. Take down part of the grill in front of the gym- 
nasium bleacher seats. 

3. Repair our gymnasium mats. 

4. Resurface with asphalt the Eli Whitney yard. 

5. Continue the policy of increasing or at least of hold- 
ing the present staff of men teachers who are capable of 
teaching physical extra-curricular activities. 



54 

6. Repaint the Eli Whitney gym and play room. 

7. Replace the guards over the High School gym 
exit" lights. 

8. Add two more sections to the bookcase in my office. 

HAROLD L. FISHER: 

Director of Physical Education. 



;>j 



Report of Recreational Director 



Through the fund provided by Mrs. Florence Ayer,, the 
Recreation Division of the School Department has not only 
served youth from 18 to 25 but has opened its doors on 
Saturdays to high school pupils during the winter and has 
provided facilities and supervision for new out of door ac- 
tivities at Forbes Field and the high school grounds. 
Indoor Activities 

Since January 1, 1940, the following programs have 
served approximately the number of different individuals 
indicated from 18 to 25 years of age or over as actual 
participants : 



Social Hygiene Class 


24 


Women's Bowling 


75 


Men's Bowling 


130 


Women's Swimming 


40 


Men's Swimming 


30 


Men's Basketball 


100 


Women's Basketball 


15 


Badminton 


50 


Miscellaneous games (indoor) 


150 


Woodworking 


20 


Town Meeting of the Air 


20 


Art 


5 


Dances 


100 



56 

The aggregate participation in indoor activities from 
Jan. 1, 1940, to Dec. 31, 1940, was 8,474, not including 
spectators. 

Facilities used in the indoor program included the high 
school gymnasium, shop, special class, room, and home 
economics room, pools at the Worcester Boys' Club and 
Y. W. C. A., Whitinsville Memorial Gymnasium, and the 
Lyman School pool and gymnasium, and Meigs Bowling 
Alleys. 

Outdoor Activities 

Most of the outdoor activities took place either at Forbes 
Field or on the high school grounds. Being undermanned, 
this department could offer only spasmodic teaching of 
games and tennis. Usually one person was present at 
Forbes Field throughout the day to rent the tennis courts 
and equipment, loan equipment for games such as soft- 
ball, volley ball, horse shoe pitching, deck tennis, tether 
ball, and darts; giving instruction where possible, but 
principally providing general supervision to give all ages 
and groups an equal chance and prevent playing under 
hazardous conditions to either player or field. First aid 
was administered in several cases and the director co- 
operated in the conducting the six team soft ball league.. 

The Director, Mr. Howard Foster, and Supt. of High- 
ways, Kobert Johnson, made a thorough study of tennis 
court construction and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Forbes and 
the Trustees of the Community Playground provided the 
funds for a complete renovation of the tennis courts and 
putting on a hard surface. In the fall, both boys' and 
girls' classes for high school students were inaugurated. 

Aggregate attendance and participation in activities 
sponsored or partially supervised by this department at 
Forbes Field and the high school grounds totalled 11,915. 



57 

The approximate number of different out of school in- 
dividuals participating in activities is as follows: 



Tennis 


100 


Soft-bajl 


125 


Cook-outs 


25 


Other outdoor games 


100 


In school individuals 




Soft-baft 


125 


Other games 


150 


Tennis 


100 



The department has also cooperated with the hockey 
club. 

Total indoor participation 8,474 

Total outdoor participation, plus spectators 11,915 



Aggregate for the calendar year 20,389 

In addition to the above activities,, a library of Recrea- 
tion Activities has been built by the Director, for which 
there is an increasing demand. Boy and Girl Scout troops, 
high school classes, school teachers, church organizations, 
and people planning parties have been served through the 
loan of this material. 

*Some conferences in vocational and social adjustments 
have also been held. 

Thus, without the outlay of funds for any new buildings, 
and their additional maintenance cost, the committee has 
provided leadership for a wholesome recreation program, 
at a comparatively low cost to the community. In addi- 
tion to the fund donated, clerical and some supervisory 
assistance has been made possible through the cooperation 
of the National Youth Administration. Most communities 
recognize their responsibility to provide such programs 



58 

and studies have shown that under qualified leadership 
they have proved definite assets. Among the benefits of 
such a program may be listed better health (both mental 
and physical), lowering of youth delinquency tendencies, 
better social and civic cooperation, and wholesome enjoy- 
ment. 

WILLARD G. PATTON, 

Recreation Director. 



09 



School Statistics 



MEMBERS-HIP BY GRADES FOR MONTH ENDING 

DEC. 31, 1940 

Senior High School 

Boys Girls Totals 

Seniors 23 28 51 

Juniors 17 38 55 

Sophomores 38 30 68 

Freshmen 42 34 76 

Post-Graduates 1 1 

Totals — Senior High 120 131 251 

Junior High School 

Boys Girls Totals 

Grade VIII 45 28 73 

Grade VII 38 30 68 

Totals — Junior High 83 58 141 

Elementary Schools 

J3oys Girls Totals 

Grade VI 42 37 79 

Grade V 17 43 60 

Grade IV 35 33 68 

Grade III 25 38 63 

Grade II 35 23 58 

Grade 1 37 33 70 

Special Class 15 15 

Totals — Elementary 206 207 413 

Totals— All Schools 409 395 805 



60 

COMPARATIVE MEMBERSHIP TABLES — ALL SCHOOLS 

December 31, 1922 750 

December 31, 1927 841 

December 31, 1932 852 

December 31, 1933 .;: 851 

December 31, 1934 861 

December 31, 1935 867 

December 31, 1936 8 41 

December 31, 1937 852 

December 31, 1938 836 

December 31, 1939 814 

December 31, 1940 805 

Decrease from last year 9 

CHANGES IN SCHOOL MEMBERSHIP — 19 23-19 40 

Senior High School — Increase 155 to 251 — 96 61.9% 

Junior High School — Decrease 145 to 141 — 4 2.7% 

Elementary Schools — Decrease 467 to 413 — 54 11.5% 

SCHOOL EXPENSES FOR 19 40 

Salaries for Instruction 65.3% 

Transportation 8.2% 

Janitors 6.3% 

Supt. of Schools, salary and other expenses 3.5% 

Miscellaneous Operating Expenses 3.4% 

Fuel u... 3.2% 

Stationery and Supplies 2.6% 

Repairs 1.8% 

Health 1.6% 

New Equipment 1.5% 

Textbooks 1.2% 

School Committee Expenses 4% 

Miscellaneous Expenses 2% 



61 



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62 

DISTRIBUTION OF HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS BY SUBJECTS 





Fresh. 


Soph. 


Jr. 


Sr. P.G. Totals 


English 


75 


66 


59 


51 


251 


Foreign Languages: 












Latin 


12 


5 


3 


1 


21 


French 


1 


36 


40 


7 


84 


Sciences: 












General Science 


57 








57 


(Chemistry 






35 


26 1 62 


Biology 


1 


45 


4 


2 


52 


Social Science: 












U. S. History 






1 


48 


49 


Mod. History 




1 


43 


1 


45 


Com. Civics 


34 








34 


Ancient History 


25 




1 


4 


30 


Mathematics. 












Elem. Algebra 


32 


1 


1 


3 


37 


Adv. Algebra 








10 


10 


Plane Geometry 




21 


3 




24 


Gen. Mathematics 


19 






1 


20 


Solid Geometry 






1 


3 


4 


Commercial Subjects: 












Com. Law 






14 


3 


17 


Com. Arith. 


14 


5 




: 


L 20 


Com. Geog. 


1 


35 




l 


37 


Bookkeeping 




28 






28 


Typewriting 




1 


23 


19 


43 


Stenography 






15 


14 


29 


Manual Arts: 












Household Arts 


18 








18 


Sewing 




10 


9 


1 


20 


Manual Training I 


13 


2 




1 


16 


Mech. Drawing I 


13 


3 


3 


5 


24 


Mech. Drawing II 




5 


6 


6 


17 


Manual Training 11 








5 


5 



DISTRIBUTION OF HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS BY COURSES 
Fresh Soph. Jr. Sr. Totals 

College 24 22 15 16 77 

General 38 17 25 20 100 

Commercial 14 29 15 15 73 

76 68 55 51 250 



63 

SCHOOL CENSUS. — OCT. 1, 1940 

Number of boys between the ages of 5 and 7 77 

Number of girls between the ages of 5 and 7 61 

Total 138 

Number of boys between the ages of 7 and 16 313 

Number of girls between the ages of 7 and 16 297 

Total 610 

Number of boys between the ages of 5 and 16 390 

Number of girls between the ages of 5 and 16 358 

Total 748 

EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 

Number of certificates issued to minors, 14-16 2 

Number of persons to whom issued 2 

Number of educational certificates issued 99 

Total number of all certificates issued 101 

Total number receiving certificates 91 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER'S REPORT 

Number of cases of absence investigated 41 

Number cases of truancy 11 






64 



Graduation Class of 1 940 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 

CLASS OF 1940 

WESTBOROUGH HIGH SCHOOL 

Thursday Evening, June 13, 1940, at 8 o'clock 

GRADUATION PROGRAM 

Processional — Festival March - - Mendelssohn 

High School Orchestra 

Invocation Rev. Lyndon S. Beardslee 

The Program Theme — Democracy 

Joseph Anderson Haley. Class President 

The Early Foundations of Democracy 

Harriet Catherine Bruce 

Music — Nightfall In Granada - Buena 

Senior Class and Girls' Chorus 

Latin American Experiments in Democracy 
John Hamlin Burroughs 

Violin Solo — Intermezzo - Provost 

Carl Albert Gerden 

Growth of Democracy In Europe Until 1914 
Vivian Eulalia Sansoucy 



65 

Democracy In Europe Since 1914 

Catherine Eileen G-annon 

Baritone Solo — Recessional - DeKoven 

Norman Elliot Gebo 

Barriers to European Democracy 

Alice Beardslee 

The American Dream and the World 

Carl Albert Gerden 

Presentation of Diplomas 
Mr. Harry E. Burroughs, School Committee Member 

School Song Class of 1940 

Awards — American Legion Medals 

D. A. R Good Citizenship Pin 
Washington and Franklin History Medal 
Woman's Club Scholarship 
Teacher's Club Prize 

Presentation of Class Gift 

Joseph Anderson Haley 

Music — Dear Land of Home - - - Sibelius 

America Triumphant - - - Demarest 

Senior Class and Girls' Chorus 
Baritone Solo - - Norman Gebo 

Recessional — March 

High School Orchestra 



GRADUATES 

Nancy Aldrich James Edward Lindsay 

Clifton Austin Bayliss John Joseph Lindsay 

Alice Beardslee Wilbur Delmond MacKay 

Irene Rose Brown Donald Herbert McGlory 

Harriet Catherine Bruce Marion Ann Nelpi 

Jeannette Madeline Buffington Nancy Lorraine Nichols 
John Hamlin Burroughs Marilyn Lincoln O'Brien 

Audrey Dearing Mary Winifred Patricia O'Neil 

Chester Lawrence Fenno Yvonne Beryl Palmer 



66 



Howard Beal Frantz 
Catherine Eileen Gannon 
Norman Elliott Gebo 
Carl AJberl Gerden 

Gladiola Joanna Giefing 
Mary Estelle Hackett 
Joseph Anderson Haley 
Albert Frazier Haworth 
Ann Hayward 
John Alfred Hey wood 
Anne Elizabeth Hogan 
Donald Thomas Hoyle 
James Jeremiah Keating 
Helena Bertha Kemp 

William Arthur Kendrick 
Charlotte Belle Kimball 
Helen Virginia Laverdure 
Frank Leonard Lekberg 



Elizabeth Patton 
Eva Mary Paul 

Wilfred Donald Penney 
Shirley Helen Ada Pickering 
Richard Stanley Piper 
Robert Harry Piper 
Sarah Gertrude Russell 
Vivian Eulalia Sansoucy 
Helen Mary Sowa 
Eleanor Lorraine Spear 
Lorraine Isabelle Temple 
George Francis Thomas 
Joan Marie Trank 

Katherine Marie Wagner 
Marjorie Arline Watson 
Raymond Edward Welsh 
Gordon Alfred Whitney 
John George Wozny 



HONOR STUDENTS 



(Those having A or B in at least 12 of the 
16 units required for graduation) 



First Honors — Carl Albert Gerden 

Second Honors — Harriet Catherine Bruce 

Third Honors — Catherine Eileen Gannon 



Alice Beardslee 
John Hamlin Burroughs 
Audrey Dearing 
Chester Lawrence Fenno 
Gladiola Joanna Giefing 
John Alfred Heywood 
Helena Bertha Kemp 
Helen Virginia Laverdure 



Elizabeth Patton 

Wilfred Donald Penney 

Shirley Helen Ada Pickering 

Vivian Eulalia Sansoucy 

Eleanor Lorraine Spear 

Joan Marie Trank 

Katherine Marie Wagner 

Marjorie Arline Watson 



CLASS OFFICERS 
John Anderson Haley, President 

Gladiola Joanna Giefing, Vice President 
George Francis Thomas, Treasurer 

Mary Winifred Patricia O'Neil, Secretary 



67 




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69 



Library 



TRUSTEES 

Esther S. Capron Term expires 1941 

Lucy G. Nason Term expires 1941 

Charles H. Reed Term expires 1941 

Florence F. Ayer Term expires 1942 

Harold G. Chamberlain Term expires 1942 

Frank W. Forbes Term expires 1942 

Katharine Maynard Term expires 1943 

Francis X. Reilly Term expires 1943 

Rufus M. Shaw Term expires 1943 

BOARD OF ORGANIZATION 

Lucy G. Nason, Chairman 

Florence F. Ayer, Vice-Chairman 

Katharine Maynard, Secretary 

Rufus M. Shaw, Treasurer 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Frank W. Forbes Francis X. Reilly Rufus M. Shaw 



70 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Esther S. C apron Charles H. Reed 

Harold G-. Chamberlain 

BOOK COMMITTEE 
Florence F. Ayer Katharine Maynard Lucy G. Nason 

ART COMMITTEE 

Florence F. Ayer Esther S. Capron Francis X. Reilly 

LIBRARIAN 

Olive Bramhall Thomson 

ASSISTANTS 

Gladys E. Ainsworth, Children's Librarian 
Ann Hayward 

JANITOR 

Francis Dodd 



To the Trustees of the 
Westborough Public Library: 

The report of the librarian for 1940 is herewith sub- 
mitted. 

The total circulation of books during the past year was 
39786 volumes, which was a slight decrease over that of 
1939. However,, I call attention to the fact that the cir- 
culation of children's books has increased by 1,500, and 
by 2,500 over that of 1938, which shows how much more 



71 

interest the younger children are taking in the library. 

During the year 529 volumes were purchased for the li- 
brary, while there were gifts of 116 volumes. We have 
made a special effort to build up our scientific and tech- 
nical books, which have been somewhat out of date, and 
which we feel will be much in use in the present world 
emergency. The problem of selecting books for a small 
library is always difficult, for while we must always try to 
satisfy the demands of those who wish to read the latest 
best-sellers, we must also try to build up the permanent 
collection and supply material to the students. We wish 
to express our appreciation for gifts of books by the fol- 
lowing donors : Mr. Donald Homans, Rev. Clyde Robbins, 
Miss Charlotte Denfeld, Mrs. Katharine Maynard, Mr. 
Charles Spear, Miss Dorothy Taft, Mrs. Brittan's estate, 
and St. Luke's Church. 

During the summer months the main rooms on the first 
floor of the library were redecorated and modern lighting 
fixtures were installed, which has greatly improved the ap- 
pearance and the efficiency of the library. 

In March Mrs. Eldridge resigned her position as assist- 
ant librarian. Miss Gladys Ainsworth was made assistant 
librarian, in addition to her duties as children's librarian. 
Miss Ann Hayward, then a member of the senior class in 
high school, was made part-time assistant, and since her 
graduation has continued working in the library. Mrs. 
Eldridge has continued as art librarian, and has arranged 
the exhibits that have been held each month in Library 
Hall. Tn July the Camera Club held a very successful 
two-day exhibit in the hall. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OLIVE BRAMHALL THOMSON, 

Librarian. 



72 

LIBRARY STATISTICS 

Number of volumes in library Jan. 1, 1940 24,516 

Increase of volumes by purchase 529 

From Curtis Fund 75 vol. 

From Farnsworth Fund 25 vol. 

From Belknap Fund 29 vol. 

Increase of volumes by gift 116 

Increase of volumes taken from Rental Shelf 57 

Number of volumes discarded 318 

Number of days library has been open 290 

Number of volumes loaned 39,786 

Daily average 138 

Smallest number loaned on one day, May 1 50 

Largest number loaned on one day, April 13 348 

Number of active borrowers 2,145 



73 



PERIODICALS ON FILE IN READING ROOM 

Weekly- 



Life 

* London News 

Saturday Evening Post 



Time 

♦Westborough Chronotype 



Monthly 



American 

American Boy 

American Cookery 

*American Girl 

♦American Legion 

American Magazine of Art 

Atlantic Monthly 

Better .Homes and Gardens 

Boy's Life 

* Commonweal 

Current History 

Field and Stream 

Flower Grower 

Good Housekeeping 

Harper's 

Harper's Bazaar 

Hobbies 

House and Garden 

House Beautiful 



Hygeia 
Jack and Jill 
Ladies' Home Journal 
Library Journal 
National Geographic 
♦Nation's Business 
Nature 

*Our Dumb Animals 
Popular Aviation 
Popular Mechanics 
Popular Science 
Radio News 
Reader's Digest 
Reader's Guide 
Saint Nicholas 
Scientific American 
♦Specialty Salesman 
Woman's Home Companion 



Quarterly 
♦Bell Telephone Quarterly Yale Review 

Daily Papers 



Boston Herald 

♦Christian Science Monitor 



New York Times 
♦Worcester Telegram 



Gift 



74 





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75 



Inspector of Animals 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit the following 
report for the year ending December 31, 1940. 

As per the direction of the Director of the Division of 
Livestock Disease Control of the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, I have made report to that body as 
follows : 

Purebred cows 37 

Purebred young cattle 27 

Purebred bulls 9 

Grade cows 679 

Grade young cattle 314 

Grade bulls 30 

Sheep 10 

Goats 16 

Swine 1,141 

All of these animals appear to be free from tuberculosis, 
lump jaw (actinomycosis),, barn itch (mange), and other 
contagious diseases. 

The conditions of the stables, as to cleanliness, light, 
ventilation, etc., is noted and report made. 

There has been brought into the town from other states, 
cattle to the number of 570. These have been identified by 
ear-tags and checked for the tests required, i. e., tubercu- 



76 

losis and Bangs abortion disease. These cattle are for re- 
placement in our herds and the quality is a vast improve- 
ment over that of former years. 

We are fortunate in having no "sleeping sickness" 
among our horses during the past year. 

No case of rabies has appeared among the dogs. There 
are now between 400 and 425 dogs licensed. A number of 
these have been given the anti-rabic vaccine, but every dog 
in the town should receive the preventive treatment. 

There have been 27 persons reported bitten by dogs and 
probably as many more not reported, as only those who 
apply to local surgeons for attention are reported to the 
Inspector. These 27 cases were investigated and the dogs 
confined for a period of 14 days. A large per cent of 
these cases were of children bitten in their own homes by 
their own dogs. 

Thirty years ago at least 55% of the cattle and a still 
larger per cent of the swine in town were afflicted with a 
contagious disease transmissible to man. Today there is 
not a case. 

During the period between 1911 and 1939, or 28 years, 
the Metropolitan Lift Insurance Co. states that the infant 
mortality from tuberculosis has been reduced from 45.2% 
to 5.5%. The Southern Worcester County Health Asso- 
ciation has stated that tuberculosis is killing 175 persons 
daily, or one every eight and one-half minutes^ Only those 
who have looked upon the long rows of little graves in our 
older cemeteries can realize the truth of this fact. The 
children of Westborough are protected by the activities 
of the Division of Livestock Disease Control from diseases 
of animals transmissible to man, and our local Board of 
Health is giving protection to Westborough children from 
contamination of the products of animal life to an extent 
second to none in New England. 

DR. CHARLES H. REED, 

Inspector. 



77 



Moth Department 



The past season has been an exceptionally good one for 
our shade trees. Weather conditions were favorable to 
maintain excellent foliage throughout the season. 

No stripping of foliage was noted in any part of town 
except by the Elm Leaf Beetle on wild scrub elms grow- 
ing along the fence rows where they had not been sprayed 
during the past two seasons. Elm Leaf Beetle still re- 
mains our major pest and while very little damage was 
seen on our shade trees along the highways, even where 
no spray was applied this past season, yet this pest was very 
plentiful on the wild elms and may increase to a dangerous 
infestation during the coming summer. This pest must be 
watched carefully and if found necessary an arsenate of 
lead spray applied the first part of June to the elm trees 
in danger of defoliation. The only shade trees that it was 
found necessary to spray this past season were the elms on 
Flanders Road where the spraying could not be done the 
previous year because of new road construction. Many of 
the large elms in adjoining towns showed the browning 
along in July and August, due to an uncontrolled infesta- 
tion of these Elm Leaf Beetles. On warm sunny days 
during the winter months these adult, greenish, yellow, 
striped beetles will appear at the windows of our homes, 
but fortunately can do no damage until they start feeding 
on the elm leaves in early summer. 

Gypsy and Brown Tail Caterpillars were not plentiful 



78 

at any time and seem to be very near the low point in their 
cycle of abundance. The same applies to the Forest Tent 
Caterpillar, which seems to be very well controlled by its 
natural enemies, parasites and disease. Because of these 
fortunate conditions no control work was found necessary 
and the town was saved from this expense. The only work 
done was very careful scouting in many sections of the 
town so as to keep posted on just what conditions were. 
From the results of this scouting I recommend that no con- 
trol work be done for another season for these pests. 

The Dutch Elm Disease situation remains about the same 
as reported last season. 

I recommend that twelve hundred dollars be appropri- 
ated in case it is found necessary to spray our elm trees. 

Appropriation $100.00 

Total expenses 44.00 

Balance $56.00 

H. P. GILMORE, 

Supt. Moth Dept. 



79 



Special Tree Pruning Appropriation 



Selectmen of Westboro : 

I wish to report to you regarding the tree pruning pro- 
ject, an appropriation for which was voted at the Annual 
Town Meeting last March. 

According to my letter to you dated April 3, 1940, the 
F. A. Bartlett Tree Expert Company was selected to do 
this work for the town as they seemed to be the best quali- 
fied to carry out the work. They started work on April 
15th with a crew averaging about six men and completed 
the work to the extent permitted by the appropriation on 
June 7th. 

The number of hours worked was 1,976 at the rate of 
about $1.25 per hour. The total number of trees pruned 
was 1,006, making the cost for pruning $2.42% per tree. 
In addition to this the amount of $415.00 was paid to the 
town for trucks and labor for trucking away the brush and 
$145.00 to the Tree Warden, Mr. Hayden, for his help and 
supervision, making a total of $3,000, the amount of the 
appropriation, or just under $3.00 per tree. 

Work was started at the junction of Milk Street and the 
Turnpike and all the town shade trees were carefully 
pruned on all the streets out as far as Chestnut Street on 
West Main Street and Hopkinton Road on South Street,, 
leaving the section of the town between East Main and 
Milk Streets yet to be done. Of a total estimated number 
of shade trees within this area of 1,312 trees, 1,006 trees 
have been pruned which includes some trees not included 



80 

on the Westboro Tree Plan, leaving same 300 yet to be 
pruned. There are also about 1,000 shade trees on the 
main highways of the town outside of this area that should 
be pruned as soon as possible to protect them from more 
serius damage caused by the hurricane of 1938. 

In the pruning of these trees by the Bartlett Co., first 
all broken and damaged branches were removed and the 
wounds treated and then the trees were thinned out and 
shaped. While the Bartlett tree experts were in town some 
trees were pinned for private property owners at a rea- 
sonable cost to the owner. There are about 950 Sugar and 
Norway Maples, 200 American Elms and 175 of other va- 
rieties within this area. There are also about 103 trees 
still standing that were either seriously damaged by the 
hurricane or are in such poor condition from other causes 
that it is a waste of the town's money to try and restore 
or save them and they should be removed as soon as pos- 
sible so that new trees can be planted in their places. All 
these trees are located and a description given on the West- 
boro Street Tree Plan as prepared by Mr. Victor G. Otto, 
July 1939. 

I strongly recommend that the town appropriate money 
to finish this tree pruning work and also that arrangements 
be made to take down the 103 worthless trees. If these 
worthless trees are removed it will then be possible to go 
ahead with a tree planting project. There are in all about 
560 replacements needed to fill in the gaps where trees 
have been lost and these replacements can be made at no 
further cost to the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. P. GILMORE. 



81 



Board of Public Welfare 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Westborough, Mass. 

Gentlemen: The annual report of the Board of Pub- 
ic Welfare for the fiscal year ending December 31,- 1940, 
is herewith submitted. 

The year 1940 has shown a definite improvement in the 
relief situation, and although the number of families aided 
has not been reduced, the amount of aid granted has been 
less due to the fact that the need has been of shorter dura- 
tion in most cases. 

W. P. A. and N. Y. A. continue to help reduce the Wel- 
fare rolls and private industry has absorbed some of the 
unemployed. Unemployment compensation has proved 
to be one of the greatest aids in keeping families off Pub- 
lic Relief, as it tides over the periods of unemployment 
that have so often made Welfare aid a necessity. 

Forty-four families,, representing 147 persons have been 
aided under Public Welfare during 1940. Of this number,, 
19 families are State cases or have settlements in other 
cities or towns and Westborough will receive full reim- 
bursement. In addition to the above number. 11 persons 
have been cared for at the Town Infirmary during the past 
year. 

Ten families have received Aid to Dependent Children 
during this year and ten were receiving this kind of aid 
as of Dec. 31, 1940. Old Age Assistance has been granted 



82 

to 153 persons during the year and 184 were receiving it 
a I the end of 11)40. On these two last forms of aid the 
(own receives partial reimbursement from the State and 
Federal Governments. 

The Board wishes to express its appreciation of the co- 
operation it has received from the stores, organizations and 
other Town Departments of Westborough. 

A full detailed financial statement of this department 
will be found under the Town Accountant's report. 

Very truly yours, 

JOHN R. HALEY, 
A, F. HITCHCOCK, 
W. M. BUXTON, 

Board of Public Welfare. 
EDNA H. BULLEN, Clerk. 



83 



Board of Health 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

The Board of Health respectfully submits the following 
report for the year 1940 : 

There were 162 cases of contagious diseases reported 
this year as follows: Erysipelas, 1; Pulmonary T.B., 1; 
Chicken Pox, 104; Dog Bite, 20; German Measles, 1; 
Pneumonia Lobar,, 4; Measles, 18; Mumps, 2; Scarlet 
Fever, 7; Septic Sore Throat, 1; Whooping Cough, 3. 

RABIES CLINIC 

As has been the custom of the Board of Health the last 
few years, a clinic was held at the fire house for the innocu- 
lation of dogs as a preventive against another outbreak 
of rabies. 

The serum for this was furnished by the Board with 
Dr. Boswell administering it. Although the clinic was 
held for a two-day period there were in all only 47 dogs 
innoculated out of a possible dog population of 550. The 
Board feels that this is a very poor showing and hopes 
that next year the people will be more responsive and will 
bring their pets to the clinic. Although there has been an 
appreciable decrease in dog bite and no positives (clinical) 
have appeared it is the hope of the Board that all citizens 
will cooperate to help eliminate this disease from our town. 

CABINS 

The Board of Health has issued four licenses to maintain 



84 

Overnight Cabins in the town of Westboro in compliance 
with the new State Regulations. This new regulation is 
to insure the traveling- public of clean and sanitary, prop- 
erly managed cabins in which to sleep. All cabins will be 
si ;il i 1 inspected and checked in regard to their water and 
sewer systems and to the moral qualifications of those who 
manage them. All cabins in the town are governed by a 
set of laws set forth by Ihe local Board of Health. We feel 
that this will help to set a high standard throughout the 
Commonwealth. 

CANCER CONTROL AND EDUCATION 

In cooperation with the State government, Westboro has 
joined with other communities in the drive to educate the 
general public in the control of cancer. In our town the 
general committee has the duty to see that in 1941 programs 
are arranged and held in all the fraternal organizations on 
the topic "The Control of Cancer." The local doctors 
have very generously offered their services as speakers. It 
is the hope that every organization in the community will 
endeavor to hold their meeting early and to> cooperate in 
this worthy cause. 

MILK 

In the past six months the Board of Health has inau- 
gurated a new system of laboratory test of all the milk that 
is produced in this town for retail and that which comes 
into Westboro to be retailed. Large charts are kept and 
each producer's milk is catalogued on it. At a glance one 
can see whether or not the producer's milk is up to the pre- 
scribed standards. 

PLUMBERS AND PLUMBING 

According to the rules and regulations of the State, 



85 

Westboro must have licensed plumbers. A meeting was 
held at which the State presented its case to all the local 
plumbers. Because there were only two licensed men in 
the town, and not wishing to incur any hardship on any 
one particular person the town was given to the end of the 
year to allow all local plumbers to take the examination and 
get their licenses. 

TUBERCULOSIS 

There are at the present time two patients from our town 
taking treatment in the out patient department at the 
county hospital and one regular patient. 

WELL CHILD CONFERENCE 

This conference is sponsored under the District Nurse 
Association under the local Board of Health. This year, 
the State Department of Health sent out doctors to co- 
operate with the District Nurse and the School Nurse to 
hold this conference on April 2-5;, at this time 82 children 
between six months and school age were examined. There 
were so many more who desired to have another conference 
that another was held on May 7 to 10, at which 78 more 
children were examined, this brought the grand total up 
to 160. There is held on the third Wednesday of every 
month a monthly Well Child conference. There were over 
211 children at this in 1940. The Board is very proud of 
the work of these conferences and we feel very grateful for 
the stellar work of our agent, Mrs. Ruth Tyrrell. 

DIPHTHERIA IMMUNIZATION CLINIC 

This clinic is under the supervision of Dr. Walter Ma- 
honey and School Nurse Helen Schuhmann, R. N. It has 
done excellent work in 1940. It is held every Wednesday 
in May at the Eli Whitney School. The number of children 
taking this is listed below: 



86 

Three doses: Under 1 year, 5; 1 year,, 12; 2 years, 14 
3 years, 10; 4 years, 2; 5 years, 10; 6 years, 11; 7 years, 9 
10 years, 1. Total 74. Less than three doses: 1 year, 1 
:\ years, 1. Total, 2. 

The totals show that there were 19 school children im- 
munized and 57 pre-school age children were taken care of. 

In order that a more complete program may be had for 
the years to come the Board of Health has had long con- 
ferences with district doctors. We are planning to hold a 
complete survey of the town in regard to all things dealing 
with the health and happiness of the citizens. This will 
also give to. future Boards something to work with. We 
hope that it will increase the value and efficiency of the 
Board. 

We wish to extend our thanks to the various town de- 
partments for their cooperation with us. 

Sincerely, 

PHILIP J. BUTTERFIELD, Chairman. 
RUSSELL E. WILLIAMS. 
WILLIAM M. ELLIOTT. Clerk. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF 
MILK, MEAT,, FOOD AND SLAUGHTERING 

Westborough, Mass., December 31, 1940. 

To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to submit the following 
report for the year ending December 31, 1940. 

SLAUGHTERING 

During the year I have inspected and stamped the car- 



87 

casses of two hundred and twenty-one swine, five cattle, 
four sheep, seven veals and one goat. 

While there has been produced a greater number of pork 
animals than ever before, the condition of the market has 
been such that our producers have found it more profitable 
to dispose of them alive and they have been slaughtered in 
the great abattoirs nearer th,e market. 

MEATS AND PROVISIONS 

For many years Westborough has demanded a high, 
quality of food stuffs, and they will take no other. Fre- 
quent visits to our retail stores give plain evidence of 
this fact. 

Our retail dealers can be highly commended for their 
protection from contamination, which fact is certainly an 
asset to the town. In every community there is an element 
who will buy cheap and unwholesome foods if offered for 
sale, which fact is the reason and necessity of maintaining 
health agencies. The inspector can truthfully state that 
our markets are clean. 

The activities of our local health board has attracted 
wide attention during the past few years for its efforts in 
behalf of a clean supply for our milk consuming citizens. 
Authorities on the subject of clean milk from many cities 
and towns and from points outside of New England have 
become interested in our results and methods employed and 
the work has been highly commended. 

Our local milk supply is now being tested eight times 
during the year and more often if necessary. These ex- 
aminations are made on samples taken at unstated times 
from the trucks in process of delivery. The milk is ex- 
amined for its content as follows: Fat, Bacteria, Sediment, 
and a miscroscopical examination is made to detect danger- 
ous matter caused by an abnormal condition of the udders. 

The following standard is required: Milk must contain 



88 

not loss than 3.35% of fat, The bacteria shall not be above 
33„000 to the c.c. There shall be no sediment. The mi- 
croscope shall show no impurities. 

To the credit of our producers it can.be stated that this 
standard, with few exceptions due to the fact that the pro- 
ducer selling but two or three quarts daily has no facilities 
for properly sterilizing the glass bottles and proper cool- 
ing of the milk as soon as it is drawn from the cow, is 
being maintained. The large dealers, having proper cooling 
and sterilizing implements, have no trouble in meeting these 
requirements. Some of these large dealers are distributing 
milk in Westborongh which contains but a count of 200 
bacteria to the c. c. 

A card showing the result of these tests is forwarded to 
the dealer immediately after the examination is made, with 
suggestions, should it not meet the requirements. These 
cards are sent in a spirit of helpfulness and not in an at- 
tempt to coerce. 

Westborough should be proud of its milk supply, for 
your children's health is safeguarded as are few town in 
the country. 

During the year, after proper inspection, there have been 
issued twenty-three permits to sell milk in Massachusetts 
by the Mass. Milk Regulation Board. This inspection has 
to be made annually in June by the local inspector and 
reported at once. It includes a complete picture of the 
condition of the cattle, stables,, milk rooms, water supply, 
drainage, light,, ventilation, refrigeration, even to the milk- 
ing stools. The local Board of Health can issue permits to 
produce milk only after all of these conditions have been 
complied with. 

June 1st of each year the local Board of Health issues 
licenses and permits to produce, sell milk at wholesale 
and retail, and to stores,, restaurants and taverns and clubs. 



89 

Following is a list of licenses and permits issued by the 
local Board of Health by the Inspector during 1940. 

Distributors' License to sell over 20 quarts daily 13 

License to Stores and Restaurants 27 

License to Pasteurize 1 

License for Frozen Deserts 2 

License to Slaughter 1 

Permits to Produce Milk 27 

Permits to Sell Milk 34 

Permits to Sell Oleomargerine 5 

DR. CHARLES H. REED, 

Inspector. 



90 



Highway Department 



CHAPTER 81 

Chapter 81 funds are comprised of equal sums of money 
contributed by the town and the state. The amounts are 
determined on a per mile basis and are budgeted against 
the various types of work under maintenance. 

The important item is the road surface itself so that as 
much money as possible is expended for tar and oil treat- 
ments. Such work as brush cutting and roadside clearing 
falls into secondary consideration. 

As has been the policy of the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Works in the past, the aim is to treat some new 
section each year with a binder of bitumen. This summer 
we were able to develop with gravel and treat, sections of 
Mill road, Otis street, Bellows road and Washington street. 
If this could be continued it would not only improve traffic 
conditions but would reduce the cost of maintenance on 
unimproved highways 

CHAPTER 90 - MAINTENANCE 

Cooperating with the Department of Public Works the 
usual maintenance program was carried out on approxi- 
mately 10 miles of street built with Chapter 90 funds, 



91 

where state, county and town contribute shares. 

A part of the money is used for drainage,, brush re- 
moval, slope clearance, and the like but the main part goes 
for surface treating. Binders used with pea-stone to pro- 
vide a nan skid surface are proving feasible and very 
practical. Some of the first sections of construction are 
showing traffic wear and it is very important to renew the 
seal before water and frost are allowed to do their damage. 

SNOW 

Snow expenditures throughout this commonwealth are 
no longer moneys spent for snow removal, in itself,, but 
rather an aim to provide safe travel for the motorist dur- 
ing the winter months. All our operations, including 
fence,, sand, and equipment, when analyzed,, are necessary 
to communication as we understand it today, but inter- 
'woven with all this is the all important factor of accident 
elimination. 

•Due to our proximity to the turnpike,, we find the de- 
mands of the motorist necessitate our carrying out work 
on a par with the Department of Public Works. For in- 
stance, a resident does not feel that he wants to apply 
chains for our town conditions and then remove them as 
he enters the state road, replacing them on his return home. 

A considerable movement is underway at this time by 
all interested officials to have some portion o*f the gasoline 
tax money refunded to the towns and cities on a per mile 
basis to take care of this work and relieve the burden that 
falls on the community today. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 

These funds include no outside money and are used for 
the incidental department expenses. We have some general 



92 

work not covered by the specific budget expenditures of 
state 1 funds that may be taken care of here. 

There are, of course, some unforseen jobs that must be 
attended to immediately as was the Co>bbs bridge on Milk 
street. Here the old 10 x 12 carrying timbers were found 
rotting out underneath and they 'were replaced and a new 
decking applied. 

Our general spring cleanup as well as the care of the 
grass plots in the square are taken care of by this account. 

TOWN DUMP 

We are trying with the funds alloted to improve the 
facilities for disposal of waste and to control the fire hazard 
at the town dump. New fence was erected which should 
help considerably to eliminate the waste paper nuisance 
on the street., 

It was with deep regret that we faced the sudden death 
of Mr. Ellsworth Graves. He had served the town effici- 
ently and faithfully in the humble role of caretaker, and 
not only was his passing noted by town officials but also 
by the many who came in daily contact with his work. 

SIDEWALKS 

This year along with the repairing, some new sections 
were laid on Beach,, Church, Whitney, Prospect and Or- 
chard streets, but a larger plan must be undertaken each 
year if we are to meet the sidewalk problem. 

The program of laying cement by the W. P. A. has 
taken care of the immediate business section, but there are 
many residential streets without even a gravel walk. 

A major portion of the system could be handled with 
the less expensive type of hot asphalt walks. They are not 
as dangerous with snow and ice and are elastic enough to 



93 

withstand frost and tree root disturbances. 

I would recommend that more work be undertaken on 
our sidewalks for the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT B. JOHNSON. 



Appendage: That public recognition be given to the 
members of this department who have so generously re- 
sponded to appeals for blood donors during the past year ; 
I extend the heartfelt thanks of many of our community. 



94 



Cemeteries 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

We are happy to report that in addition to keeping our 
Cemeteries in excellent condition, all work resulting froiri 
the hurricane has been completed,, having removed the bal- 
ance of tree stumps from Pine Grove and Midland Ceme- 
teries as well as completing the Tomb. 

We have also added 1,100 feet of copper bearing steel 
fence in Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Respectfully, 

JAMES S. HUNTER, Chairman. 
NATHAN E. ANDREWS. 
PAUL F. BRIGHAM. 
WILLIAM H. SANFORD. 
E. IRVING HULBERT Clerk. 



95 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of the Town of Westborough : 

In the early part of 1940 an application was received 
from Alan Gray Holmes for a license to operate a Summer 
Theatre in the Town Hall and after much consideration a 
license was issued for the summer months and the price 
fixed at $85.00 per week, with the provision the electric 
light bill and the janitor service was to be paid by Mr., 
Holmes. As no heat was required during the period of time 
that the hall was rented we feel that the Town benefited 
greatly, as $891.00 was received for this rent. 

We also feel that the Town derived much free adver- 
tising on account of the theatre being located in this Town 
and that many of the townspeople also benefited to a great 
extent because of the actors being housed in the Town. It 
was reported by Mr. Holmes that during their stay in 
Westboro they played to approximately 30,000 people and 
it can be assumed that a considerable revenue Was taken 
in from these people by the merchants. 

We feel sure that the people of Westboro will welcome 
the Summer Theatre for the year 1941. 

We are asking for an additional amount in the Town 
Hall appropriation for 1941 to finish the interior painting 
of the Town Hall, which was started in 1939. This will 
consist mainly of painting the main auditorium. 

This year we feel certain that Chapter 90 construction 
will be available for the Town of Westborough and we have 



96 

already asked the State to contribute $20,000. We have 
also asked the County to contribute $10,000 and we are 
asking that the Town appropriate $5,000 for this work to 
go with the $5,000 balance already on hand as our share to 
finish West Main street. 

The parking lot on the east side of the Town Hall, for 
which an appropriation was made in 1940, was completed 
by the Superintendent of Streets and has been used to 
great advantage. It is noted that many of the merchants 
are now parking their cars in this lot. 

For the cooperation given us in the past year by the 
various department heads, we wish to express our sincere 
thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WENDELL F. HAYWARD, 
CHRISTOPHER J. TYRRELL, 
ELMER W. BENNETT, 
Selectmen of the Town of Westborough. 



97 



List of Jurors- 1940- 1941 



Aldrich, Arlon H., 45, Carpenter, 17 Blake 

Allen, Albert H., 5 2, Fireman, 10 Baxter 

Ayres, Willard M., 3 0, Truck Driver, 84 South 

Beaman, Roger W., 3 9, Maynard 

Billings, Albert N., 55, Ice Dealer, Bowman 

Bixby, George C, 5 4, Tape Worker, 84 Milk 

Boiselle, Richard E., 62, Charge Attendant, Baxter 

Bombard, Lester H., 36, Shipper, 65 East Main 

Buxton, Archibald, 48, Pharmacist, Ruggles 

Clapp, Leon A., 5 3, Clerk, 9 2 Milk 

Concaugh, Patrick J., 48, Parmer, Milk 

Crooker, Frank C, 44, Tool Maker, 15 Ruggles 

Crosby, William M., 62, Assessor, 44 West 

Crowell, Baron H., 51, Superintendent, 37 Blake 

Darling, Cyrus, 50, Carpenter, 60 Ruggles 

Davis, Melvin H., 63, Machinist, 23 East Main 

Dean, James J., 64, Plumber, 71 South 

DeArmond, Chester W., 41, Carpenter, 46 Ruggles 

Dines, William L., 68, Machinist, 9 Phillips 

Dunn, Edward C, 40, Farmer, Fisher 

Elliott, Wiliam M., 5 2, Estimator, 99 West ^Main 

Farrar, Chester L., 3 4, Mechanic, Milk 

Frantz, Ralph W., 43, Poultryman, Oak 

Fraser, Warren F., 59, Consulting Engineer, 7 High 

Gibbons, Raymond J., 3 5, Insurance Agent, 4 Harrison Ave. 

Glazier, George, 49, Clerk, 45 South 

Gleason, Daniel A., 59, Electrician, 81 South 

Gribble, Francis J., 57, Poultryman, Lyman 

Haley, John R., 5 2, Mason, 8 6 Milk 

Heffron, John J., 65, retired, 10 High 

Henry, Peter J., 63, Laborer, 30 Ruggles 

Higgins, Robert J., 31, Taxi Manager, 24 East Main 



98 

Hunter, Robert R., 46, Tape Worker, 76 Milk 

Kemp, Erford C, 41, Salesman, 39 West 

Krull, Leonard M., 48, Manufacturer, West Main 

Lamb, Maurice C, 38, Mechanic, 10 Whitney 

LeBeau, Francis, 44, Truck Driver, 10 Phillips 

Lundberg, Robert jM., 44, Laborer, 5 Grove 

Marrandette, Thomas E., 24, Chauffeur, 8 Central 

Marsh, Walter E., 51, Laborer, Maple Ave. 

Mason, J. Baron, 44, Manufacturer, 30 Blake 

Maxwell, Herbert W., 60, Salesman, 11 Cross 

McCarthy, James M., 51, Leather Dealer, 52 Ruggles 

McDonald, George R., 47, Painter, 18 High 

Midgley, Frank L., 49, Florist, 78 West Main 

Miller, William, Jr., 3 4, Lineman, 20 Grove 

Morrison, Harold E., 40, Painter, 14 Phillips 

Naples, Charles, 41, Retired, 18 Green 

Nichols, Arthur W., 40, Attendant, 5 Fisher 

O'Brien, William H., 46, Shoe Worker, 19 Cottage 

Osman, Paul J., 48, Laborer, 1 Phillips 

Packard, George H., 5 4, Salesman, 20 West 

Perron, Charles, 45, Chauffeur, 88 Milk 

Reilly, Joseph, 57, Clerk, 17 Charles 

Richard, Edward C, 63, Salesman, 7 Beach 

Rossi, Artemio W., 28, Laborer, 14 Green 

Statzell, Guilford I., 5 2, Farmer, East Main 

Stearns, Austin, 56, Retired, 3 4 Cross 

Stockbridge, Clarence R., 63, Chauffeur, 11 Central 

Swan, Everett I., 62, Merchant, 9 Boardman 

Sweet, Cleon C, 65, Assessor, 9 Parkman 

Thomas, William, 55, Carpenter, 15 West 

Trethewey, Lamont L., 54, Painter, 33 Charles 

Tyler, Ralph S,, 43, Office Manager, 20 Ruggles 

Uhlman, Parker, 57, Farmer, East Main 

Waddell, Charles M., 42, Auto Dealer, 19 Cross 

Wall, Axel E., 49, Farmer, Flanders Road 

Ward, James E., 45, Wood Treater, 21 Summer 

Warren, Leroy, 29, Timekeeper, 88 South 

Warren, William W., 59, Clerk, 31 Charles 

West, Irving W., 33, Machinist, Milk 

CHRISTOPHER J. TYRRELL, 
WENDELL F. HAYWARD, 
ELMER W. BENNETT, 

Selectmen of Westborough. 



99 



Water and Sewer Commissioners 



The Water Commissioners respectfully submit the follow- 
ing report for the year ending Dec. 31, 1940. 

Number of active services 941 

Number of meters 850 

Number of hydrants 145 

Miles of water main 32 

Nine new services were installed during the year. 
Twenty-seven old services were renewed. A total of 2068 
feet of service pipe was laid. Copper pipe was used in 
nearly all cases. 

The W. P. A. Water Survey started in 1939 was com- 
pleted. The survey gives the department, for the first 
time, maps of the entire system, card index of each main 
gate and each hydrant location. An individual card for 
each service gives the location of the service shut-off,, the 
size and type of pipe used. 

The commissioners are asking for an increase in the ap- 
propriation for 1941. The funds are to he used to purchase 
additional meters,, increase the stock of service pipe and 
fittings, hydrants, gate valves and service equipment. More 
money is needed for maintenance on the watershed, for 
with the purchase of the Heath and Billings' land in 1935, 
the area to be maintained was doubled. The number of 
services to be renewed is increasing each year. In 1937, 



100 

1,035 feet of service pipe was laid ; in 1940, 2,068 feet laid. 
Respectfully submitted,, 

CHARLES A. KIMBALL, 
ELMER, W. BENNETT, 
MAURICE C. LAMB, 

Water Commissioners. 



The Sewer Commissioners respectfully submit the follow- 
ing report for the year ending Dec. 31, 1940. 

Number of services 619 

Miles of main sewers 8 

Number of filter beds 14 

Total acres of filter beds 7 acres 

Four new services were connected with the main sewers 
during the year. 

We are asking for an increase in the 1941 appropriation. 
The area of the filter beds prior to the construction of the 
new beds in 1930 was about five and one-half acres. The 
average yearly appropriation for the department was 
$4600. Since 1930 the filter bed area has been seven acres 
and the average yearly appropriation $4000. 

The commissioners are asking for a special appropriation 
of $2500 to resurface four of the filter beds. With the 
removal of sludge from the beds, some of the fine gravel 
and sand are also taken. The beds are now from four to 
six inches below their original level. We believe the sum 
asked will clean and supply sufficient sand to get the beds 
to their original level. This work will greatly increase the 
efficiency of the beds resurfaced and should continue 
yearly until all beds are resurfaced. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES A. KIMBALL, 
ELMER W. BENNETT, 
MAURICE C. LAMB, 

Sewer Commissioners., 



101 



Report of Tree Warden 



Last year this department received two appropriations; 
$400.00 at the March town meeting and $400.00 at the 
September special meeting. 

The first appropriation was used for the removal of 
broken limbs,, low dangerous branches and dead wood and 
this money by no means covered the trees of the town. 

The appropriation in September was used for the removal 
of several trees and the complete prunning of many others. 

Since there are many more trees that need prunning a 
more substantial appropriation is needed this year to carry 
on this work. 

I, therefore, recommend that a larger sum be appropri- 
ated this year to take care of the remaining streets out of 
the center and the outlying districts which have been ne- 
glected in the past. 

GEORGE E. HAYDEN, 

Tree Warden. 



102 



Report of Board of Fire Engineers 



This department responded to 17 box alarms and 68 
still alarms during the year of 1940. 

The assessed valne of buildings in which fire occurred 
was $22,831.|00. The estimated value of the contents of 
these buildings was $23,600.00. The insurance paid on 
buildings was $4,676.40. The insurance paid on contents 
was $2,572.60., 

WILLIAM C. BLOIS, 
DANIEL P. MOYNIHAN, 
GEORGE F. HIGGINS, 

Board of Fire Engineers. 



REPORT OF FOREST WARDEN 

During the year of 1940 this department responded to 
87 calls for grass and brush fires, all of which were of 
small area. I believe this is due to the help received from 
the fire tower in spotting the fires and also due to prompt 
response of the men at the fire station. 

I wish to caution the people about the use of incinerators 
in back yards during the windy spring months, because 
many of our calls are from this cause and only quick hard 
work on the part of our men saved several houses this year. 
Wire incinerators are very dangerous at any time. 

WILLIAM C. BLOIS, 

Forest Warden. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Town of Westborough 

Massachusetts 

For the Year Ending December 31,1 940 

In accordance with Chapter 41, S. 61 
of the General Laws 

WILLIAM P. McGAHEY, Accountant 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and 
Citizens of the Town of Westborough: 

In accordance with Section 61, Chapter 44, of the Gen- 
eral Laws, I hereby submit a financial report of the Town 
of Westborough, together with all receipts and expendi- 
tures for the year 1940. 

For the cooperation given me by the several departments, 
I wish to extend my appreciation. 



Respectfully, 



WILLIAM P. McGAHEY, 

Town Accountant. 



Receipts 1940 



TAXES — CURRENT YEAR: 

Poll $2,320 00 

Personal 22,844 08 

Real Estate 79,238 73 



TAXES — PREVIOUS YEARS: 

Poll $556 00 

Personal 587 57 

Real Estate 50,397 26 

Tax Titles 361 29 



I ROM COMMONWEALTH OF MASS.: 

Income Taxes $15,838 94 

Corporation and Business Taxes 11,10 2 19 
Highway Fund, Chap. 504, Acts 

1939 9,386 19 

Loss of Taxes, State owned land 2,609 2 6 

Loss of Taxes, Met. Dist. Com. 3 77 8 3 



LICENSES: 



Alcoholic Beverages $2,520 00 

Common Victuallers 52 00 

Sunday Movies 260 00 

Pool and Bowling 30 00 

Junk 84 00 

Gasoline 46 00 



$104,402 81 



51,902 12 



39,314 41 



4 

Peddlers 14 00 

Auto Dealers 40 00 

Innholders 5 00 

Moving Pictures 10 00 

Fireworks 5 00 

Auctioneers 4 00 

Dance Hall 5 00 

Sunday Golf 32 00 

Oil Storage 20 00 

Entertainment 45 00 

Sundry 5 00 

GRANTS AND GIFTS: 

Federal Government: 

Old Age Assistance $22,435 42 

Old Age Assistance Admin 619 81 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,839 00 

Aid to Dependent Children, 

Admin 173 17 

Fines : 

Court 

State: 

Chapter 90 Highway Construe. $1,165 69 

Chapter 9 Highway Main ten. 921 95 

Chapter 81 Highway 9,239 13 

Vocational Education 782 36 



County : 

Chapter 90 Highway Construe. 
Chapter 9 Highway iMainten. 
Dog Licenses (refund) 



$582 85 
921 95 
923 67 



3,177 00 



25,067 40 



17 20 



12,109 13 



2,428 47 



PRIVILEGES: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes, 

1940 $11,718 33 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes, 

previous years 366 90 



12,085 23 



5 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
Town Clerk: 

Dog Licenses $1,061 20 

Town Hall: 

Rent of Court Room 1,200 00 

Summer Theater 891 00 

Rent of Halls 405 50 

Selectmen : 

Sale of Land to G. M. Beede... 300 00 

Telephone Calls, 1939 3 45 

Telephone Calls, 1940 9 95 

Sale of Maps of Town 2 00 



Total General Government 3,873 10 

PROTECTION: 
Police Dept.: 

Cell Rentals, other towns $7 00 

Fire Dept.: 

Care of Fire Alarm Boxes, 

Westboro State Hospital... 5 4 00 

Boston & Albany, grass fires... 21 10 

Sealer of AVeights and Measures: 

Sealing Fees 56 17 

Forestry : 

Insect Pest Extermination 26 40 

Dog Officer: 

Shooting and Care of Stray 

Dogs, from County Dog Fund 15 00 

Total Protection 179 67 



6 



HEALTH AND SANITATION: 

Anti Rabie Vaccine (County).... $116 00 
Contagious Diseases (reimbursed 

from individuals) 20 36 

Miscellaneous Licenses 5 00 

Sewer Dept.: 

Current Year Sewer Rates $5,162 37 

1939 Sewer Rates 830 16 

1938 Sewer Rates 935 91 

Sewer Services 60 50 



Total Health and Sanitation 

HIGHWAYS: 

Repairs to road (gas installed) $190 00 

Oiling Driveways, etc 18 4 63 

Plowing Snow, Route 30 (State) 130 00 



7,130 30 



504 63 



TOWN INFIRMARY: 

Sale of Products $11 25 

Sale of Hens 37 70 

Telephone Calls 40 



49 35 



CHARITIES: 

Individuals (reimbursed to town) $107 10 

Cities and Towns 243 14 

Comm. of Mass. (State cases).. 1,713 33 

Aid to Dependent Children (State) 2,929 49 

Old Age Assistance (State) 14,555 44 

Old Age Assistance (Cities and 

Towns) 942 88 

SOLDIERS BENEFITS: 

State Aid $527 20 

Military Aid 82 50 



20,491 38 



609 70 



SCHOOL DEFT.: 

Tuition and Transportation of 

State Wards $2,259 78 

Other Tuition 66 45 

Sale of Books, Supplies, etc 114 58 

Spurr House Rent 166 00 



LIBRARY: 



Library Fines (overdue books) $165 35 
Rent of Hall 6 00 



WATER DEPT.: 

Rates $14,611 50 

Services 1,125 73 

Sale of Hurricane Trees 60 00 



CEMETERIES: 

Sale of Lots and Graves $402 00 

€are of Lots and Graves 507 50 

Opening Graves 569 00 

Grass and Device 201 00 

Foundations 99 75 

Marker for Grave 1 00 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS: 

Anticipation of Revenue Loans $75,000 00 
Temporary Loans 10,094 50 



INTEREST 



Real and Personal Taxes $2,592 18 

Tax Titles 83 84 

Excise Taxes (motor vehicle).. 8 23 

Water Rates 18 89 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Income 1,182 01 

Library Trust Funds Income... 1,696 12 



2,606 81 



171 35 



15,797 23 



1,780 25 



85 094 50 



5,581 27 



8 

TRUST FUNDS WITHDRAWALS: 

Curtis Charity Fund $45 00 

Belknap Library Fund 31 03 

Wright Library Fund 490 99 

Farns worth Library Fund 49 93 

Kimball Flower Fund 7 39 

Dr. Harvey Cemetery Fund 50 2 

Cemetery Perpetual Care, un- 
expended income 450 00 

Smalley Library Fund Adjustment 693 75 



TRUST AND INVESTMENTS: 

Cemetery Per. Care Bequests... $1,050 00 
Highway Machinery Fund 5,28 7 85 



REFUNDS: 



Old Age Assistance $133 00 

Water 1 91 

Insurance 3 80 

Highway 9 81 

Highway Gasoline (from State) 33 36 



1,818 11 



6,337 85 



181 88 



Total Receipts $402,711 15 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1940 39,558 76 



Grand Total $442,269 91 



Payments 1940 



MODERATOR: 

Salary $30 00 

SELECTMEN: 

Salaries $450 00 

Clerical 191 40 

Printing, Stationery Postage.... 46 44 

Telephone 67 25 

Miscellaneous 20 37 



ACCOUNTING: 

Salaries $1,100 00 

Printing, Stationery, Postage... 12 68 

Adding Machine 57 50 

Office Supplies 26 13 



TOWN TREASURER: 

Salary $600 00 

Printing, Stationery, Postage... 40 46 

Check Signer and Protector 150 00 

Surety Bond 125 00 

Checks 43 50 

Miscellaneous 7 97 



775 46 



1,196 31 



966 93 



10 

TAX COLLECTOR: 

Salary ... $1,300 00 

Printing, Stationery, Postage... 18 6" 73 

Surety Bond 247 00 

Adding Machine and Staples... 119 3 

Safe Burglary Insurance 16 50 

Office Books 19 75 

Miscellaneous 3 53 



ASSESSORS: 



LEGAL: 



Counsel $14 00 

Releases from Injuries to Persons 4 00 

Miscellaneous 6 30 



TOWN CLERK: 

Salary $400 00 

Fees 335 50 

Printing, Stationery, Postage.... 60 09 

Telephone 40 44 



1,892 81 



Salaries $1,500 00 

Printing Reports 273 74 

Printing, Stationery, Postage.... 43 9 9 

Carfare,. Auto Hire, Dues 164 00 

Telephone 29 72 

Abstracts 50 28 

Office Supplies (books, etc.) 24 94 

Miscellaneous 13 03 

i 2,098 70 

OTHER FINANCE OFFICES 

AND ACCOUNTS: 

Certification of Notes 10 00 

FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Clerical $100 00 

Printing, Stationery, Postage... 25 00 



125 00 



24 30 



7 


50 


19 


00 


25 


00 


32 


25 


54 


60 



11 

Surety Bond 

Death Certificates 

Recording Town (Meeting 

Administering Oaths 

Office Supplies and Equipment. 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION: 

Salaries of Registrars $260 00 

Election Officers 395.00 

Printing Street List... 203 24 

Clerical Work on Street List... 400 00 

New Booths...., 113 20 

Storing Booths 15 00 

Setting Up and Removing Booths 82 65 

^eals for Election Officers 67 55 

Auto Hire 30 00 

Administering Oaths • 20 00 

Ballots anl Ballot Case 57 91 

Printing, Stationery, Postage... 9 6 41 



TOWN HALL: 

Janitor's Salary $1,630 00 

Assistant 79 25 

Fuel 699 01 

Light 439 53 

Janitor's Supplies 76 02 

Painting Interior (contract).... 500 00 

Repairs to Lights 85 06 

Hauling Ashes 27 00 

Water 31 87 

Repairs to Boiler 124 40 

Repairs (general) 85 05 

Towels 22 50 

Equipment (library table) 31 00 

Shrubbery 20 00 

Miscellaneous 22 10 



974 3! 



1,740 96 



3,872 79 



12 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY: 
Police Dept.: 

Salaries Day Patrol $1,905 00 

Salaries Night Patrol 2,150 00 

Special Duty 227 50 

Printing, Stationery, Postage... 21 60 

Telephone 150 03 

Auto Hire for Police Work 127 

Ambulance Service 30 00 

Care of Prisoners and their food 21 50 

Typewriter 30 10 

Membership New England Police 10 00 

Targets, Rifles, Bullets 88 69 

Badges 12 50 

Miscellaneous 23 10 

Fire Dept: 

Salary Permanent Man $1,900 00 

Assistants ' 310 00 

Engineers' Salaries 375 00 

Call Men, salaries 2,198 75 

Equipment and Supplies 661 90 

Hose 26 50 

Gas and Oil 98 88 

Fuel 319 18 

Light 158 56 

Repais to Building 14 50 

Telephone 89 35 

Care of Fire Alarm System 59 00 

Hauling Ashes 27 00 

Chimney Fires 183 40 

Laundry 44 95 

Water 6 50 

Lithoprint 34 45 

Repairs to Trucks 187 35 

Gas Boiler 100 00 

Card Permits 11 60 

Forest Fires: 

Fighting Fires (labor) $258 10 

Hose 220 50 



4,797 02 



6,806 87 



478 60 



13 

TREE WARDEN: 

Salary $589 38 

Assistants 166 50 

Supplies 85 



MOTH DEPARTMENT: 

Labor $24 00 

Spraying 20 00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND 
MEASURES: 

Salary $i00 00 

Transportation 15 00 

Weights 4 61 

Inspecting scales 5 00 

Supplies 3 77 



756 73 



44 00 



128 38 



FISH AND GAME WARDEN: 

Salary 150 00 

DOG DEPT.: 

Investigating, Care and Dispos- 
ing Stray Dogs 42 90 

HEALTH AND SANITATION: 

Clerical and Clerk $200 00 

Quarantine and Contagious Diseases: 

Board and Treatment 259 29 

Medicine 75 

Fuel 5 84 

Groceries 38 46 

Tuberculosis : 

Board and Treatment 684 00 

Transportation to Hospital for 

Treatment to Patient 200 00 



14 

Inspections: 

Schick Test 20 00 

Milk Tests 207 45 

Salary Milk and jMeat Inspector 300 00 

Salary Animal Inspector 150 00 

Transportation (Animal Inspect.) 74 40 

Burial Agent 25 00 

Rabies Treatment 215 82 

Miscellaneous on Rabies (labor, 

traveling expense, etc.) 19 45 

Record Books 12 87 

Legal : 21 00 

Printing, Stationery, Supplies... 41 89 



County Tuberculosis Hospital: 

Care and Maintenance $2,628 99 

Construction and Interest 2,577 30 



2,476 22 



5,206 29 



TOWN NURSE: 

Salary 1,200 00 

TOWN DUMP: 

Labor $143 70 

Equipment Hired 256 00 

Rent of Land (for dump) 150 00 

, , 549 70 

GARBAGE REMOVAL: 

Contract 800 00 

SEAVERDEPT.: 

Labor $3,757 8.0 

Clerical 269 96 

Pipe and Fittings 33 15 

Printing and Office Supplies... 20 65 

Sewer Rod Equipment 204 60 

Town Equipment Hired 8 50 

Supplies 55 34 

4,350 00 



15 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES: 

Supt. Salary 

Labor 

Telephone 

Light 

Water 

Fuel 

(Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment charged to Highway 
Machinery Fund 

Hired Equipment 

Survey of Road 

Culverts 

Painting Flagpole 

Fencing 

Cloride and Salt 

Pipe 

Stationery, Office Supplies 

Gas and Oil for Trucks 

Equipment and Repairs 

Cement, Stone, Patch, etc 

Lumber 

Storage 

Paint 

Signs 

Trailer Service 

Posts 

Brooms 

Miscellaneous Supplies 

SNOW REMOVAL*: 

Supt. Salary 

Labor 

Town Owned Equipment charged 
to Highway Machinery Fund 

Outside Trucking 

Oil and Gas 

Fael 

Lunches 

Salt 

Equipment, Parts and Repairs 
Welding 



$80 00 
610 87 
159 62 

34 67 
6 50 

58 74 



126 00 

180 00 

60 00 

78 40 

12 00 

18 35 
44 50 

165 00 

50 17 

134 83 

742 96 

389 35 

163 66 

35 00 

43 84 

19 94 
40 00 
15 00 
21 50 

158 91 



$612 


00 


7,570 


28 


1,053 


00 


2,064 


75 


*2S 


09 


11 


84 


37 


10 


16 


60 


378 


54 


32 


75 



3,449 91 



11,999 95 



16 



HIGHWAY MACHINERY ACCOUNT: 



Equipment and Repairs (trucks) $2,768 97 

Gas and Oil 1,415 51 

New Truck 1,450 00 

Storage of Town Trucks 332 73 

Fuel 64 36 

Telephone 11 87 

Tools (rakes, axes, etc.) 141 53 

Anti Freeze and Chains 47 58 

Hose and Electric Drills 94 11 

Acetylene and Oxygen 18 58 

CHAPTER NO. 81 HIGHWAY: 

Supt. Salary $1,068 00 

Labor 8,111 37 

Trucks and Equipment Hired... 2,266 43 

Stone, Sand and Gravel 561 01 

Tarmac Wasco-lite Mixture 3,499 48 

Bit. Patch (topping) 229 31 

Paint 12 25 

Sewer Covers and Frames 100 37 

Pipes, Coupling 201 06 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to Highway 

Machinery Fund 2,250 72 

CHAPTER NO. 90 MAINTENANCE: 

Supt. Salary $112 00 

Labor 1,374 00 

Outside Trucking 73 50 

Hired Equipment 147 00 

Asphalt 304 78 

Cement 5 97 

Stone 562 25 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to Highway 

jMachinery Fund 420 50 



6,345 24 



18,600 00 



3,000 00 



17 



SIDEWALKS: 



Supt. Salary $184 00 

Labor 1,431 25 

Trucking Hired 16 00 

Stone and Cement 152 85 

Sod 15 50 

Supplies 2 22 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to ^Highway 

Machinery Fund 198 00 

1,999 82 

TOWN HALL PARKING LOT: 

Supt. Salary $32 00 

Labor 409 99 

Engineering Service 10 00 

Hired Equipment 134 00 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to Highway 

Machinery Fund 52 00 

Stone 310 60 

_ 948 59 

REPAIRS TO SHADE TREES: 

Labor $2,869 50 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to Highway 

Machinery Fund 130 50 

3,000 00 

STREET LIGHTING: 

Contract 4,484 45 

PUBLIC WELFARE: 

Salaries $300 00 

Clerical 780 00 

Printing, Stationery, Postage... 67 26 

State Report (clerical) 25 00 

Groceries 928 32 

Oil, Coal, Wood 159 31 



18 



Board and Care 128 74 

Medical and Hospital Cases 1,031 99 

Clothing and Shoes 43 50 

Cash 2,828 84 

Transportation 35 80 

Telephone 6 2 9 8 

Rent 262 00 

Dentist 9 00 

Burials 100 00 

Miscellaneous 59 64 



6,822 38 



TOWN INFIRMARY: 

Salary of Supt. and Matron.... $1,200 00 

Other Employees 599 50 

Telephone 27 59 

Groceries 754 18 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Shoes 83 69 

Fuel 402 50 

Light 136 62 

Gas, Oil and Repairs (truck).... 60 9 4 

Medical and Supplies 73 89 

House Supplies 64 59 

Painting Town Infirmary 440 00 

Repairs to Building (material, 

etc.) 397 81 

Hay and Grain 313 25 

Papers and Tobacco 47 40 

Shoeing Horses 40 40 

Garden Seed, etc. (phosphate).. 65 60 

Live Stock 22 00 

Veterinary 22 00 

New Equipment 84 40 

Cement and Sand 10 60 

Electrical Repairs 14 45 

Boiler Repairs 473 81 

Transportation 5 40 

Miscellaneous 47 90 



5,388 52 



19 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN: 
APPROPRIATION : 

Clerical $97 50 

Cash 2,688 00 



AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN: 
FEDERAL AGENT: 

Clerical $58 50 

Cash 2,303 50 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 
APPROPRIATION : 

Cash $25,204 95 

Board and Care 15 00 

Opening Graves 10 00 

^Medical 48 45 

Office Supplies 112 48 

Out of Town Relief 337 06 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 
FEDERAL GRANT: 

Cash $21,973 60 

Out of Town Relief 29 17 

Clerical 600 00 

Transportation 147 66 



2,785 50 



2,362 00 



25,727 94 



22,750 43 



CURTIS CHARITY FUND INCOME: 

Cash 45 00 

SOLDIERS' BENEFITS: 

Clerical $403 80 

Cash 1,605 62 

Board and Care 437 40 

Medicine and Medical Attendance 53 75 

Hospital Care 309 00 



20 

Groceries 41 00 

Fuel 55 39 

Rent 239 98 

Printing, etc 18 10 

Miscellaneous 12 00 

STATE AID: 

Clerical $110 00 

Cash 444 80 

MILITARY AID: 

Clerical $40 00 

Cash 255 00 

TRADE SCHOOL TUITION: 

Cash 

SCHOOLS: 

Superintendent's Salary $4,000 00 

Clerical 250 00 

Truant Officer 75 00 

Printing, Stationery, Postage ... 128 00 

Telephone 110 86 

School Census 75 00 

Teachers' Slaraies: 

High 17,060 60 

Elementary 25,116 75 

Text Books and Supplies: 

Books (High) 105 93 

Supplies (High) 1,287 45 

Books (Elementary) 546 66 

Supplies (Elementary) 1,020 81 

Transportation : 

High and Elementary 5,600 00 



3,176 04 



554 80 



295 00 



868 56 



21 



Janitor Services: 

High 1,769 28 

Elementary 2,511 51 

Fuel and Light: 

Light (High) 408 02 

Light (Elementary) 351 99 

Fuel (High) 778 38 

Fuel (Elementary) 1,444 87 

Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 

Repairs (High) 749 89 

Care of Grounds 100 00 

Repairs (Elementary) 667 93 

Janitor Supplies (High) 331 20 

Jantior Supplies (Elementary).. 214 14 
Rewiring Harvey School and 

New Fixtures 355 00 

Screens 67 70 

Furniture and Furnishings: 

High 358 90 

Elementary 239 85 

Coal Car Body 65 00 

Other Expenses: 

Rent for Playground, Lockers.. 100 00 

Diplomas for Graduation 67 85 

Health Supplies 64 27 

Doctor and Nurse 1,020 00 

Use of Car for Nurse's Visits 

to Homes 50 00 

Laundry 144 82 

Hauling Ashes 66 07 

Water (High and Elementary) 9 4 8 9 

Sewer Tax 13 30 

Expense to Spurr House (water, 

repairs) 35 71 

Miscellaneous 51 32 



67,498 95 



22 



LIBRARY: 

Salaries and Wages: 

Librarian's Salary $1,200 00 

Assistant Librarians 1,217 75 

Janitor 875 00 

Fuel 596 02 

Lights 120 24 

Repairs to Building 125 05 

Janitor's Supplies 56 37 

Stationery and Postage 57 00 

Printing and Supplies 166 20 

Water 8 88 

Telephone - 32 59 

Removing Rubbish 22 00 

Wall Map 10 93 

Miscellaneous 28 65 

,Books and Periodicals: 

Books 669 31 

Periodicals 40 35 

Book Binding 121 43 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS INCOME: 

Expended: 

Belknap Art Fund $31 03 

Emma Farnsworth Fund 49 9 3 

Loretta Wright Fund 490 99 



W. P. A. — SELECTMEN: 

Commissary: 

Labor at Commissary $209 25 

Rent 400 00 

Lights 9 15 

Bags, Boxes, etc 148 98 

Trucking 468 75 

U. S. Treasurer, Admin. Exp.... 180 17 

Framingham Commissary 28 4 9 8 

Miscellaneous 19 51 



5,347 77 



571 95 



1,720 79 



23 

Water Survey Project: 

Salary, Engineer $688 79 

Rent 190 00 

Lights 18 66 

Equipment 327 88 

Supplies and Miscellaneous Exp. 225 55 

Stamps 2 63 

Gas and Oil... 105 05 

Transportation 14 40 

Blue Prints 156 67 

Water Commissioner: 

Labor 

Farm to Market Roads: 

Coordinator's Salary $420 00 

Labor 69 00 

Office Supplies 8 35 

Transportation 71 00 

Oil and Gas 27 83 

Stone and Gravel 371 44 

Trucking 2,028 75 

Telephone 16 61 

Shovels, Axes, Rakes, Dynamite 203 42 

Repairs to Equipment Used 95 30 

Miscellaneous 20 09 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to Highway 

Machinery Fund 675 25 

Sidewalks : 

Coordinator's Salary $3 23 60 

Oil 88 90 

Trucking 990 63 

Machine Work 15 37 

Stone, Sand and Cement 748 57 

Repairs to Equipment 40 95 

Transportation 35 00 

Telephone 25 14 

Lumber 159 27 

Storage 16 00 



1,729 63 
94 50 



4,007 04 



24 



Supplies and Misc. Expenses... 103 60 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to Highway 
Machinery Fund 6 25 

Music Project: 

Salary 

Tomb Project: 

Transportation $88 00 

Trucking 80 25 

Sand, Brick 88 85 

Oil 4 00 

Paint 26 17 

Flashing 39 76 

Lumber 61 74 

Vault Rail 30 75 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to Highway 

Machinery Fund 17 25 

Miscellaneous Supplies 45 39 

Lake Chauncy Beach Project: 

Trucking $1,044 75 

Lumber 1 54 

Sand 81 20 

Renting Crane 720 00 

Boots 30 00 

Miscellaneous Supplies 8 03 

Charge for Town Owned Equip- 
ment, credited to Highway 

Machinery Fund 121 50 

Vital Records: 

Printing $163 57 

Drawer Unit 50 54 

Graves Registration: 

Office Supplies $24 81 

Stationery, Printing 21 56 



2,553 28 
12 00 



482 16 



2,007 02 



214 11 



25 



Gas 8 36 

Tracing Cloth 26 74 

Repairing Typewriter 15 68 

Telephone 3 17 

Blue Prints 10 83 

Miscellaneous 1 30 



UNCLASSIFIED: 

Printing Town Report $353 55 

Town Insurance 3,491 76 



MEMORIAL* DAY: 

Posters $5 50 

Microphone 12 00 

Dinners, Lyman School Band... 36 00 

Bullets 12 65 

Transportation 20 00 

Flags 21 50 

Flowers 96 50 

Wreaths 56 40 

Drum Corps Services 29 45 

Speaker 10 00 



112 45 



3,845 31 



300 00 



UNPALD 1935 BILL: 

Albert Lewis 102 10 

UNPAID 1939 BILLS: 

Payroll, Snow Removal $120 00 

J. S. Nason 71 28 

Thompson Spa 2 20 

Everett Swan 1 00 

Puritan Lunch 10 40 

Corbett Concrete Pipe 57 40 

Payroll 26 00 

S. W. Wheeler 1 20 

Bd. Public Welfare, Framingham 134 15 

Proctor Lumber 1 44 

Junior Literary Guild 1 93 

427 00 



26 

\\ i:\THERVANE — TOWN HAXX. : 

Labor $375 00 

Horse and Sleigh 120 50 

495 50 

WATER SURVEY: 

Engineer's Salary 8 69 37 

WATER DEPT. : 

Commissioners' Salaries $150 00 

Clerical 553 26 

Printing, Stationery, Postage... 107 00 

Telephone 84 73 

Labor 6,627 10 

Pipe, Fittings and Gate Valves 931 91 

Equipment 366 05 

Meters and Supplies 250 42 

Hydrants 70 56 

Gas and Oil 127 34 

Repairs to Truck 116 12 

Thawing Water Main 76 90 

Rent (tool house and garage).. 289 00 

Light 17 25 

Police Duty at Reservoir 25 00 

Office Equipment 117 50 

Ice for Fountain 24 00 

Hose for Flushing Hydrants... 24 06 

^Miscellaneous 11 10 

— 9,969 30 

WATER SURVEY OF PRESENT NEEDS: 1,000 00 

CEMETERY DEPT.: 

Clerical $150 00 

Supt. Salary 1,176 00 

Labor 2,623 00 

Loam and Gravel 49 48 

Flowers, Shrubs, etc 69 00 

Removing Tree Stumps 185 00 

Top Dressing 125 55 

Town Equipment Hired 18 75 

Posts 57 10 

Equipment and Repairs 230 31 

Miscellaneous 38 01 

4,587 20 



27 




CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE 




UNEXPENDED INCOME: 




Supt. Salary 


$224 00 


Labor 


325 50 


Miscellaneous 


6 52 



556 02* 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE 

ADJUSTMENT: 

SALE OF LOTS AND GRAVES ACCOUNT: 

Fence, Pine Grove Cemetery... 

DR. HARVEY CEMETERY FUND INCOME: 

Gravel 

HARRY KIMBALL CEMETERY FLOWER 
FUND INCOME: 

Flowers 

REBUILDING CEMETERY RECEIVING VAULT: 

Labor $34 00 

Paint 7 34 

Copper Gutters, etc 65 00 

Cementing Floor 95 00 

Plans and Specifications 38 00 

INTEREST AND DISCOUNT: 

Anticipation of Revenue Loans $64 84 

Temporary Loans 25 38 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS: 

Anticipation of Revenue Loans $75,000 00 
Temporary Loans 19,794 50 



10 00 



04 00 



50 02 



7 39 



239 34 



90 22 



94,794 50 



28 

AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT: 

State Taxes $11,840 00 

Veterans' Exemption 15 19 

County Taxes 6,664 18 

Auditing Municipal Accounts .... 216 2 6 

State Parks and Reservations.. 203 48 

Dog Licenses (County) 1,062 40 

Cemetery Per. Care Bequests 

Invested 1,050 00 

'Library Trust Fund Invested... 693 75 



REFUNDS: 

19 40 Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

19 40 Real Estate Taxes 

1940 Poll Taxes 

193 9 Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

1939 Real Estate Taxes 

Water 

Cemetery 

Over payment on Common Vict 
ualler 's License 



3 $320 


99 


64 


32 


2 


00 


3 25 


79 


40 


08 


10 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 



21,745 26 



467 18 



Total Payments $392,909 84 

Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1940 49,360 07 



Grand Total $442,269 91 



29 



Trust Funds, Cash and Securities 



Trust Funds, Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Trustees $13,566 67 

In Custody of Town Treasurer 104,752 96 

$118,319 63 



Kimball Library Fund $1,117 08 

Lyman Belknap Libary Fund 3,780 08 

Susan L. Bowman Library Fund 1,000 00 

Ada F. Goddard Library Fund 400 00 

Charles S. Henry Library Fund 5,000 00 

Mrs. Geo. Jenkins Library Fund 108 73 

George N. Smalley Library Fund 22,230 55 

Emma A. Farnsworth Library Fund 5 41 58 

Laurietta M. Wright Library Fund 2,117 13 

^William Curtis Library Fund 13,566 67 

Francis White Forbes Library Fund 15,000 00 

Wm. Curtis Charity Fund 1,347 55 

Harry Kimball Flower Fund 205 12 

Dr. Edwin B. Harvey Cemetery Fund 1,718 80 

Cemetery Per. Care Unexpended Income Fund 1,516 69 

Sarah F. Aldrich Flower Fund 101 25 

Ada F. Goddard Flower Fund 25 31 

Gates and Goodell Flower Fund 77 47 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 48,465 62 



$118,319 63 
*In custody of Trustees. 



30 

TOWN OF W I :S I BOROUGH — BALANCE SHEET 

ASSETS 



Cash in Bank 

Accounts Receivable: 

Real Estate Taxes, 1939 $21,883 18 

Personal Taxes, 1939 2,469 78 

Poll Taxes, 1939 140 00 

Real Estate Taxes, 1940 37,659 46 

Personal Taxes, 19 40 2,775 68 

Poll Taxes, 1940 400 00 

Tax Titles 3,069 29 



49,360 07 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes, 1940 

Departmental Accounts Receivable: 

Sewer Rates, 1939 $625 65 

Sewer Rates, 1940 1,249 74 

Sewer Services, etc 121 51 

Town Hall 125 00 

Police Department 4 00 

Fire Department 34 60 

Highway Department 40 00 

Spurr House 21 00 

Health Department 76 3 14 

Public Welfare Department 389 

Old Age Assistance Department 2,430 85 

Aid to Dependent Children 3 44 17 

State Aid, Veterans' 444 80 

Military Aid, Veterans' 255 00 

Cemetery, Annual Care 73 2 00 

Cemetery, Opening Graves, etc. 12 00 

Water Rates and Service Accounts Receivable: 

Water Rates $4,616 07 

Water Services 557 24 

Water Department, Petty Cash 

Aid to Highways: 

Chapter 90, Maintenance (State) $78 05 



68,397 39 
360 16 



7,592 46 



5,173 31 
30 00 



31 



FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1940 
LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Temporary Loans 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes Rev. $3 60 16 

Department Revenue 7,592 46 

Water Revenue 5,173 31 

Tax Titles Revenue 3,069 29 

Overlays: 

Overlay, 1939 $819 96 

Overlay, 1940 943 31 

Overestimates: 

Division of Parks (State) 

Water Available Surplus 

County Dog Licenses 

Overlay Reserve 

Sale of Lots and Graves 

Highway Machinery Fund 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Income 

Library Trust Funds Income 

Unexpended Balances: 

Highway Machinery Account ... $2,0 9 6 49 
West Main St. Improvement.... 5,000 00 
Aid Dep. Children — Fed. Grant 366 40 

Aid Dep. Children — Admin.F.G. 6 34 

Old Age Assistance — Fed. Grant 1,126 51 

Future Water Supply Needs 1,000 00 

Cemetery Lot Account 663 15 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Unex- 
pended Income 51 33 



$2,000 00 



16,195 22 



1,763 27 

16 00 

5,970 36 

1 80 

3,228 97 

402 00 

887 85 

1,172 01 

1,696 12 



10,310 22 



32 

HA LANCE SHEET (continued) ASSETS 



Chapter 90, Maintenance (County) 78 05 

Chapter 81, Maintenance (State) 60 87 



216 97 

Veterans' Exemption (State) 15 19 



$131,145 55 



33 

BALANCE SHEET (continued) LIABILITIES and RESERVES 

Excess and Deficiency, Surplus Revenue 87,501 73 



$131,145 55 



34 

DEPARTMENT BUDGET ESTIMATES FOR 1941 

Moderator $30 00 

Selectmen 800 00 

Accounting 1,200 00 

Town Clerk 1,000 00 

Town Treasurer 950 00 

Tax Collector 1,700 00 

Assessors 2,100 00 

Certification of Town Notes 20 00 

Legal 300 00 

Election and Registration 1,200 00 

Town Hall 3,800 00 

Police 5,000 00 

Fire Department — -Salaries 4,970 00 

Fire Department — Incidentals 2,600 00 

Sealer of Weights and (Measures 135 00 

Moth Department 1,200 00 

Game Warden 150 00 

Tree Warden 700 00 

Forest Fires 500 00 

Dog Department 50 00 

Health Department 2,500 00 

Animal Inspector 225 00 

Garbage Removal 800 00 

County T. B. Hospital 5,161 74 

Sewer Department 5,000 00 

Town Dump 550 00 

Highways and Bridges 3,450 00 

Snow Removal 7,000 00 

Sidewalks 3,000 00 

Street Lighting 4,500 00 

Welfare 11,500 00 

Aid to Dependent Children 4,000 00 

Old Age Assistance 27,000 00 

Soldiers' Relief 3,500 00 

State Aid 600 00 

Military Aid 600 00 

Schools 68,500 00 

Trade Schools 1,000 00 

Public Library 3,100 00 

Printing Town Reports 400 00 



35 



Memorial Day Observance 

Town Insurance 

Unpaid 1939 Bill 

Unpaid 1940 Bills 

Finance Committee Reserve Fund 

Water Department 

Cemetery Department 

Interest and Discount 

Town Nurse 

W. P. A. — Selectmen 

Chapter 90 Highway Maintenance 

Chapter 81 Highway Maintenance 

Finance Committee 

Repairs to Shade Trees 

West Main St. Improvement, Chap. 90 



300 


00 


3,500 


00 


4 


55 


384 


98 


3,000 


00 


10,000 


00 


2,500 


00 


200 


00 


1,200 


00 


5,000 


00 


1,200 


00 


9,300 


00 


125 


00 


3,000 


00 


5*000 


00 


$225,506 


27 



UNPAID 1939 AND 1940 JBELLS 



John T. Marcy, 1939, W. P. A 

Maurice Hyland, 1940, Town Dump 

Irving Harper, 1940, Police 

Worcester Suburban Electric ICo., 19 40, Town Hall 

Waddell Service Station, 19 40, W. P. A 

Thomas A. Quinn, 1940, Sewer 

A. Beach, 1940, Sewer 

Gannon Motors, Inc., 1940, Water 



$4 
40 


55 


00 


260 


cro 


L 61 


19 


4 


68 


8 


75 


6 


66 


3 


70 



$389 53 



36 

APPROPRIATIONS, EXPENDED AND BALANCES, 1940 



Appropriations and 

Transfers Expended Balances 

Moderator $30 00 $30 00 

'selectmen 800 00 775 46 $24 54 

Accounting 1,200 00 1,196 31 3 69 

Town Clerk 1,000 00 974 38 25 62 

Town Treasurer 950 00 

Trans, from Reserve 2500 96693 807 

Tax Collector 1,900 00 1,892 81 7 19 

Assessors 2,100 00 2,098 70 1 30 

Certification Town Notes 3000 1000 2000 

Legal 500 00 24 30 475 70 

Election and Registration 1,800 00 1,740 96 59 04 

Town Hall 3,600 00 

Trans, from Reserve 300 00 3,872 79 27 21 

Police 4,800 00 4,797 02 2 98 

Fire Dept. Salaries 4,970 00 4,783 75 186 25 

Fire Dept. Incidentals... 2,100 00 2,023 12 76 88 

Sealer Weights-Meas 135 00 128 38 6 62 

Moth Dept 100 00 44 00 56 00 

Tree Warden 400 00 

Trans, from Sur. Rev. 400 00 756 73 43 27 

Repairs to Shade Trees 3,000 00 3,000 00 

Forest Fires 500 00 478 60 21 40 

Game Warden 150 00 150 00 

Dog Dept 50 00 42 90 7 10 

Health 2,500 00 2,251 82 248 18 

Animal Inspector 225 00 224 40 60 

Garbage Removal 80000 80000 

Town Nurse 1,200 00 1,200 00 

County T. B. Hospital. ... 5.206 29 5,206 29 

Sewer 4,000 00 

Trans, from Reserve 350 00 4,350 00 

Town Dump 550 00 549 70 30 

Highways and Bridges.. 3,450 00 3,449 91 09 

Snow Removal 12,000 00 11,999 95 05 

Chapter 81 Highway 9,300 00 

From Comm. Mass 9,300 00 18,600 00 



37 

Appropriations and 

Transfers Expended Balances 

Chapter 9 [Highway 

Maintenance 1,000 00 

From Comm. Mass 1,000 00 

From County 1,000 00 3,000 00 

Sidewalks 2,000 00 1,999 82 18 

Highway Machinery Acct. : 

Balance Jan. 1, 1940.. 09 

Trans, from Highway 

Mach. Fund 8,441 64 6,345 24 2,096 49 

Street Lighting 4,500 00 4,484 45 15 55 

Flanders Rd. Imp., Deficit 531 87 531 87 

Welfare 13,500 00 12,210 90 1,289 10 

Aid to Depend. Children 5,000 00 3,173 00 

Trans, to W. P. A 1,000 00 

Old Age Assistance 26,000 00 25,685 36 

Soldiers' Relief 4,000 00 3,176 04 

Military Aid 300 00 285 00 

State Aid 600 00 554 80 

Schools 67,500 00 67,498 95 

Trade School 1,000 00 868 56 

Public Library 3,300 00 

Dog Fund 923 67 

Trust Funds Income.. 1,435 99 5,347 77 311 89 
W. P. A. — Selectmen: 

Balance Jan. 1, 1940.. 22 03 

Appropriation 5,000 00 

Trans, from Sur. Rev. 8,500 00 12,822 48 699 55 

Printing Town Reports 35355 35.3 55 

Parking Lot Improve.... 950 00 948 59 1 41 

Memorial Day 300 00 300 00 

Town Insurance 3,500 00 3,491 76 8 24 

Unpaid 1935 Bill 102 10 102 10 

Unpaid 1939 Bills 427 00 427 00 

Water Project, Labor... 9450 9450 

"Finance Committee 125 00 125 00 

Weathervane and Gold- 
leafing Town Hall Dome 500 00 495 50 4 50 

Reserve Fund 4,000 00 1,675 00 2,325 00 

Water 9,000 00 

Trans, from Reserve 1,000 00 9,969 30 30 70 



827 


00 


314 


64 


823 


96 


5 


00 


45 


20 


1 


05 


131 


44 



38 

Appropriations and 

Transfers Expended Balances 

Water Survey Project 
Engineer : 

Balance Jan. 1, 1940 269 37 

Appropriation 600 00 869 37 

Future Water Supply Needs: 

Balance Jan. 1, 1940 1,000 00 

Trans, from Sur. Rev. 1,000 00 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Cemetery 3,450 00 

Cem. Per. Care Inc 1,172 73 4,587 20 35 53 

Rebuilding Cem. Rec. Vault: 

Balance Jan. 1, 1940 300 00 255 34 44 66 

Cemetery Lot Account: 

Balance Jan. 1, 1940 992 15 

Trans, from Sale of 
Lots and Graves Fd. 575 00 904 00 663 15 

Cem. Per. Care Unex. Inc.: 

Balance Jan. 1, 19 40 

Trans. Cem. Unex. Fd. 
Interest and Discount... 



157 35 






450 00 


556 02 


51 33 


200 00 


90 22 


109 78 



39 



Report of State Auditor 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Division of Accounts 

State House Boston 

February 17. 1941. 
To the Board of Selectmen: 
Mr. Wendell F. Hay ward, Chairman, 

Westborough, Massachusetts. 
Gentlemen: I submit herewith my report of an audit 
of the books and accounts of the Town of Westborough for 
the year ending December 31, 1940, made in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is 
in the form of a report made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, 
Assistant Director of Accounts. 
Very truly yours, 

THEODORE N. WADDELL, 

Director of Accounts. 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell, 

Director of Accounts. 

Department of Corporations and Taxation, 

State House, Boston. 

Sir: As directed by you, I have made an audit of the 
books and accounts of the Town of Westborough for the 
year ending December 31, 1940, and report thereon as 
follows : 



40 

The records of the financial transactions of the several 
departments receiving or disbursing money for the town, 
or committing bills for collection, were examined, checked 
and verified by a comparison with the reports and the 
records in the town accountant's office. 

The accountant's ledger was analyzed, the appropriation 
accounts being cheeked to the town meeting records of ap- 
propriations and transfers voted. A balance sheet, show- 
ing the financial condition of the town on December 31, 
1940, was prepared and is appended to this report. 

An examination of the appended balance sheet shows 
the town to be in. excellent financial condition. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were ex- 
amined and checked in detail. The receipts, as recorded, 
were compared with the records of the town accountant 
and with the records of the departments making payments 
to the treasurer, while the payments by the treasurer were 
checked with the selectmen's warrants authorizing the dis- 
bursement of town funds. 

The cash book additions were verified and the treasurer 's 
cash balance on January 14. 1941, was proved by recon- 
ciliation of the bank balances with statements furnished 
by the banks of deposit and by actual count of the cash in 
the ofQ.ce. 

The tax title deeds on hand were listed and the amounts 
transferred to the tax title account were verified. The tax 
titles as listed were compared with the records in the 
Registry of Deeds. 

The savings bank books and securities, representing the 
investment of the trust funds in the custody of the treas- 
urer were examined and listed, the income being proved 
and the withdrawals verified. 

It was noted that checks for salaries and wages due em- 
ployees of several departments are being turned over to 
certain employees of these departments for delivery to 



41 

those entitled to these payments. It is urged that all 
checks be either distributed by the treasurer to the payees 
or mailed to them by him whenever personal delivery is 
impractical, since no person other than the treasurer or 
his duly appointed assistant has the legal authority to 
make payments in behalf of the town. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were exam- 
ined and cheeked. The tax accounts outstanding according 
to the previous examination were audited, and all subse- 
quent commitment lists were added and reconciled with 
the warrants of the assessors committing the taxes for 
collection. 

The collector's payments to the treasurer were verified 
by a comparison with the treasurer's cash book, the abate- 
ments as recorded were checked with the assessors' abate- 
ment records,, and the outstanding accounts were listed 
and proved with the accountant's ledger. 

The outstanding accounts were further verified by send- 
ing notices to a number of persons whose names appeared 
on the books as owing money to the town, and from the 
replies received, it appears that the accounts, as listed, 
are correct. 

The records of licenses issued by the selectmen, town 
clerk, and the health department were examined and 
checked, and the payments to the state and the town were 
verified. 

The surety bonds of the treasurer, collector, and the town 
clerk were examined and found to be in proper form. It 
was noted that the water registrar does not furnish a bond 
to the town. 

In addition to the departments mentioned, the books and 
accounts of the sealer of weights and measures and of the 
police, fire, moth, sewer, highway, public welfare, school, 
water and cemetery departments were examined and 
checked, and the payments to the treasurer were verified. 



42 

For the cooperation received from the several town 
officials while engaged in making the audit, I wish, on be- 
half of my assistants and for myself, to express 
appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERMAN B. DINE, 
Assistant Director of Accounts. 



43 



Index — Town Accountant 



RECEIPTS: 

Cemeteries 7 

Charities 6 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 3 

Dog Officer 5 

Fire Department 5 

Forestry 5 

General Government 5 

Grants and Gifts 4 

Health and Sanitation 6 

Highway Department , 6 

Infirmary 6 

Interest 7 

Licenses and Permits 3-4 

iMunicipal Indebtedness 7 

Old Age Assistance 6 

Police Department 5 

Privileges 4 

Protection 5 

Public Library 7 

Refunds to Town 8 

Schools 7 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 5 

Selectmen 5 

Sewer Department 6 

Soldiers' Benefits 6 

Taxes — Poll, Personal and Real Estate 3 

Town Clerk 5 

Town Hall 5 

Trust Funds, withdrawals from -8 

Trust Investments 8 

Water Department 7 



44 

PAYMENTS: 

Accounting 9 

Agency, etc 28 

Aid to Dependent Children 19 

Assessors 10 

Cemeteries 26-27 

Certification of Notes 10 

Curtis 'Charity Fund 19 

Dog Department 13 

Elections and Registrations 11 

Finance Committee 10 

Fire Department 12 

Fish and Game Warden 13 

Forest Fires 12 

Garbage Removal 14 

Health and Sanitation 13 

(Highways and Bridges 15 

Highways — Chapter 81 16 

Highways — Chapter 90 Maintenance 16 

Highway Machinery Account 16 

Interest and Discount 27 

Legal 10 

Library 22 

Library Trust Funds Income 22 

Memorial Day 25 

( Military Aid 20 

^Moth Department 13 

(Moderator 9 

Municipal Indebtedness 27 

Old Age Assistance 19 

Police Department 12 

Protection of Persons and Property 12 

Public Welfare 17 

Refunds 28 

Repairs to Shade Trees 17 

School Department 20 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 13 

Selectmen 9 

Sidewalks 17 

Sewer Department 14 

Snow Removal 15 

Soldiers' Benefits 19 

State Aid 20 



45 

Street Lighting 17 

Tax Collector 10 

Town Clerk 10 

Town Dump 14 

Town Hall 11 

Town Hall Parking Lot 17 

Town Infirmary 18 

Town Nurse 14 

Trade School Tuition 20 

Treasurer 9 

Tree Warden 13 

Unclassified 25 

Unpaid Bill, 1935 25 

Unpaid Bills, 1939 25 

Water Department 26 

Water Survey '.. 26 

Water Survey of Present Needs 26 

Weathervane — Town Hall 26 

W. P. A. — Selectmen 22 

Appropriations, Expended and Balances 36-38 

Auditors' Report 39-42 

Balance Sheet 30-33 

Department Estimates for 1941 34-35 

Trust Funds 29 

Unpaid Bills, 1939, 1940 35 



46 



Index — Town Officers' Report 



Appointments for 1940 8-11 

Appropriations for 1940 19-21 

Births, 1940 32 

Board of Health, Report of 83-89 

Board of Public Welfare, Report of 81-82 

Cemetery Trustees, Report of 94 

Deaths, 1940 32 

Dogs Licensed 32 

Fire Department, Report of Engineers 102 

Forest Fire Warden, Report of 102 

Highway Department, Report of 90-93 

Inspector of Animals, Report of 75-76 

Library Trustees, Report of 69-74 

Librarians Report 70-71 

List of Jurors 97-98 

Marriages, 1940 32 

Moth Department, Report of 77-78 

School Committee, Report of 3 4-3 6 

Graduation Exercises, High School 64-66 

Physical Education 51-54 

Recreational Director, Report of 55-58 

School Calendar 34 

School Census 63 

School Physician 50 

School Statistics 59-63 

Superintendent, Report of 37-49 

Teachers in Service, Jan. 1, 1941 67-68 

Selectmen, Report of 95-96 

Special Tree Pruning Appropriation 79-80 



47 

Town Clerk's Report 32-33 

Town Meeting, March 4 12-25 

Town Meeting, May 3 26-27 

Town ( Meeting, September 7 29-31 

Town Officers, 1940 3-7 

Tree Warden, Report of 101 

Water and Sewer Commissioners, Report of 9 9-100